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Prevalence of post-thrombotic syndrome after cardiac catheterization

Luceri, Michael J; Tala, Joana A; Weismann, Constance G LU ; Silva, Cicero T and Faustino, E Vincent S (2015) In Pediatric Blood & Cancer 62(7). p.7-1222
Abstract

BACKGROUND: As the survival of children with cardiac disease increases, chronic complications of deep venous thrombosis from cardiac catheterization, particularly post-thrombotic syndrome, may be important to monitor for and treat, if needed. We aimed to determine the prevalence of this syndrome in children who underwent cardiac catheterization.

PROCEDURE: We conducted a cross-sectional study of children <18 years old at least 1 year from first catheterization through the femoral vein. We used the Manco-Johnson instrument, the only tool validated in children, to diagnose post-thrombotic syndrome. We defined the syndrome as a score ≥ 1. It was considered physically and functionally significant if the score was ≥ 1 in both... (More)

BACKGROUND: As the survival of children with cardiac disease increases, chronic complications of deep venous thrombosis from cardiac catheterization, particularly post-thrombotic syndrome, may be important to monitor for and treat, if needed. We aimed to determine the prevalence of this syndrome in children who underwent cardiac catheterization.

PROCEDURE: We conducted a cross-sectional study of children <18 years old at least 1 year from first catheterization through the femoral vein. We used the Manco-Johnson instrument, the only tool validated in children, to diagnose post-thrombotic syndrome. We defined the syndrome as a score ≥ 1. It was considered physically and functionally significant if the score was ≥ 1 in both physical and functional domains of the instrument. We also conducted ultrasonography to assess for thrombosis and valvular insufficiency.

RESULTS: We enrolled 62 children with a median age of 4 months during catheterization and a median of 5.4 years since catheterization. A total of 40 children had post-thrombotic syndrome (prevalence: 64.5%; 95% confidence interval: 51.3-76.3%), the majority of which were mild. Presence of cyanotic congenital heart disease, total number of catheterizations, use of antithrombotic agents at any time after the first catheterization, age at first catheterization, or time since first catheterization was not associated with the syndrome. A total of seven children (prevalence: 11.3%; 95% confidence interval: 3.2-19.4%) had physically and functionally significant syndrome. None of the children had abnormalities on ultrasonography at the time of enrollment.

CONCLUSIONS: Post-thrombotic syndrome is a common complication after cardiac catheterization. Manifestations are usually mild and unlikely to require treatment.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cardiac Catheterization/adverse effects, Child, Child, Preschool, Connecticut/epidemiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Femoral Vein/surgery, Follow-Up Studies, Heart Diseases/complications, Humans, Male, Postthrombotic Syndrome/epidemiology, Prevalence, Prognosis, Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology
in
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
volume
62
issue
7
pages
6 pages
publisher
John Wiley and Sons Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:84929340704
ISSN
1545-5017
DOI
10.1002/pbc.25438
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
301f1e76-c09b-4714-9f12-94e3ba95aa8e
date added to LUP
2019-01-25 14:43:53
date last changed
2019-10-23 06:07:27
@article{301f1e76-c09b-4714-9f12-94e3ba95aa8e,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: As the survival of children with cardiac disease increases, chronic complications of deep venous thrombosis from cardiac catheterization, particularly post-thrombotic syndrome, may be important to monitor for and treat, if needed. We aimed to determine the prevalence of this syndrome in children who underwent cardiac catheterization.</p><p>PROCEDURE: We conducted a cross-sectional study of children &lt;18 years old at least 1 year from first catheterization through the femoral vein. We used the Manco-Johnson instrument, the only tool validated in children, to diagnose post-thrombotic syndrome. We defined the syndrome as a score ≥ 1. It was considered physically and functionally significant if the score was ≥ 1 in both physical and functional domains of the instrument. We also conducted ultrasonography to assess for thrombosis and valvular insufficiency.</p><p>RESULTS: We enrolled 62 children with a median age of 4 months during catheterization and a median of 5.4 years since catheterization. A total of 40 children had post-thrombotic syndrome (prevalence: 64.5%; 95% confidence interval: 51.3-76.3%), the majority of which were mild. Presence of cyanotic congenital heart disease, total number of catheterizations, use of antithrombotic agents at any time after the first catheterization, age at first catheterization, or time since first catheterization was not associated with the syndrome. A total of seven children (prevalence: 11.3%; 95% confidence interval: 3.2-19.4%) had physically and functionally significant syndrome. None of the children had abnormalities on ultrasonography at the time of enrollment.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Post-thrombotic syndrome is a common complication after cardiac catheterization. Manifestations are usually mild and unlikely to require treatment.</p>},
  author       = {Luceri, Michael J and Tala, Joana A and Weismann, Constance G and Silva, Cicero T and Faustino, E Vincent S},
  issn         = {1545-5017},
  keyword      = {Cardiac Catheterization/adverse effects,Child,Child, Preschool,Connecticut/epidemiology,Cross-Sectional Studies,Female,Femoral Vein/surgery,Follow-Up Studies,Heart Diseases/complications,Humans,Male,Postthrombotic Syndrome/epidemiology,Prevalence,Prognosis,Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {7--1222},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons Inc.},
  series       = {Pediatric Blood & Cancer},
  title        = {Prevalence of post-thrombotic syndrome after cardiac catheterization},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.25438},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2015},
}