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Older People's “Voices”—On Paper: Obstacles to Influence in Welfare States—A Case Study of Sweden.

Harnett, Tove LU and Berg, Stig (2009) In Journal of Aging & Social Policy 21(1). p.94-111
Abstract
The official rhetoric of welfare states unconditionally pays tribute to older people’s right to express dissatisfaction. In practice, users of older services in welfare states may be deprived of their “exit” options and face considerable constraints when it comes to raising their “voices.” For example, when older people in nursing homes would like to lodge a complaint, they may well be referred to the very staff members they depend on in their everyday lives.



This article analyzes a national case study in which these contradictory tendencies are especially explicit: formal influence channels for older people in Sweden. Using data from structured interviews with 100 representatives of Swedish municipalities and drawing... (More)
The official rhetoric of welfare states unconditionally pays tribute to older people’s right to express dissatisfaction. In practice, users of older services in welfare states may be deprived of their “exit” options and face considerable constraints when it comes to raising their “voices.” For example, when older people in nursing homes would like to lodge a complaint, they may well be referred to the very staff members they depend on in their everyday lives.



This article analyzes a national case study in which these contradictory tendencies are especially explicit: formal influence channels for older people in Sweden. Using data from structured interviews with 100 representatives of Swedish municipalities and drawing on Hirschman’s (1970) theory on exit and voice, the article analyzes obstacles to older service users’ influence in Sweden and develops explanations for these obstacles in terms of social contexts. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
welfare state, older people, voice, Sweden, influence, exit
in
Journal of Aging & Social Policy
volume
21
issue
1
pages
94 - 111
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:59949084931
ISSN
0895-9420
DOI
10.1080/08959420802539118
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f991269c-c260-4417-ada9-bef6c032cdc5 (old id 3045941)
date added to LUP
2012-08-30 13:36:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:43:28
@article{f991269c-c260-4417-ada9-bef6c032cdc5,
  abstract     = {The official rhetoric of welfare states unconditionally pays tribute to older people’s right to express dissatisfaction. In practice, users of older services in welfare states may be deprived of their “exit” options and face considerable constraints when it comes to raising their “voices.” For example, when older people in nursing homes would like to lodge a complaint, they may well be referred to the very staff members they depend on in their everyday lives. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
This article analyzes a national case study in which these contradictory tendencies are especially explicit: formal influence channels for older people in Sweden. Using data from structured interviews with 100 representatives of Swedish municipalities and drawing on Hirschman’s (1970) theory on exit and voice, the article analyzes obstacles to older service users’ influence in Sweden and develops explanations for these obstacles in terms of social contexts.},
  author       = {Harnett, Tove and Berg, Stig},
  issn         = {0895-9420},
  keyword      = {welfare state,older people,voice,Sweden,influence,exit},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {94--111},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Aging & Social Policy},
  title        = {Older People's “Voices”—On Paper: Obstacles to Influence in Welfare States—A Case Study of Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08959420802539118},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2009},
}