Advanced

Air-oxidized linalool-a frequent cause of fragrance contact allergy.

Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Andersen, Klaus E; Bruze, Magnus LU ; Johansen, Jeanne D; Garcia-Bravo, Begoña; Gimenez Arnau, Ana; Goh, Chee-Leok; Nixon, Rosemary and White, Ian R (2012) In Contact Dermatitis 67(5). p.247-259
Abstract
Background:

Linalool is a common fragrance terpene that, in pure form, is not allergenic or is a very weak allergen. However, linalool autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. In a Swedish study, oxidized linalool 6.0% in petrolatum (pet.) gave 5% positive patch test reactions in 2500 dermatitis patients.



Objectives:

To investigate whether oxidized linalool 6%, with a stable concentration of the main haptens, the linalool hydroperoxides (Lin-OOHs) in pet., could be a useful tool for the detection of contact allergy in an international setting.



Methods:

Oxidized linalool 6.0% (Lin-OOHs 1%) pet. was tested in 2900 consecutive... (More)
Background:

Linalool is a common fragrance terpene that, in pure form, is not allergenic or is a very weak allergen. However, linalool autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. In a Swedish study, oxidized linalool 6.0% in petrolatum (pet.) gave 5% positive patch test reactions in 2500 dermatitis patients.



Objectives:

To investigate whether oxidized linalool 6%, with a stable concentration of the main haptens, the linalool hydroperoxides (Lin-OOHs) in pet., could be a useful tool for the detection of contact allergy in an international setting.



Methods:

Oxidized linalool 6.0% (Lin-OOHs 1%) pet. was tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Denmark, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and Australia. Results. Overall, 6.9% (range 3-13%) of the patients showed positive patch test reactions to oxidized linalool. Doubtful reactions were found in 9.2% of the patients (range 0-36%). Few irritant reactions were seen.



Conclusions:

In an international setting, oxidized linalool has been shown to be a common allergen. Oxidized linalool 6.0% (Lin-OOHs 1%) pet. is a useful, standardized and stable tool for the detection of contact allergy in dermatitis patients. Many patients showing positive patch test reactions to oxidized linalool would not have been informed of their fragrance allergy if this specific test had not been performed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
67
issue
5
pages
247 - 259
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000309612100001
  • pmid:22906042
  • scopus:84867329346
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02134.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
63da573b-59e0-4850-97a0-b780039f6ada (old id 3047372)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22906042?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-09-05 20:11:31
date last changed
2017-11-12 04:07:42
@article{63da573b-59e0-4850-97a0-b780039f6ada,
  abstract     = {Background:<br/><br>
Linalool is a common fragrance terpene that, in pure form, is not allergenic or is a very weak allergen. However, linalool autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. In a Swedish study, oxidized linalool 6.0% in petrolatum (pet.) gave 5% positive patch test reactions in 2500 dermatitis patients. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objectives:<br/><br>
To investigate whether oxidized linalool 6%, with a stable concentration of the main haptens, the linalool hydroperoxides (Lin-OOHs) in pet., could be a useful tool for the detection of contact allergy in an international setting. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods:<br/><br>
Oxidized linalool 6.0% (Lin-OOHs 1%) pet. was tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Denmark, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and Australia. Results. Overall, 6.9% (range 3-13%) of the patients showed positive patch test reactions to oxidized linalool. Doubtful reactions were found in 9.2% of the patients (range 0-36%). Few irritant reactions were seen. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions:<br/><br>
In an international setting, oxidized linalool has been shown to be a common allergen. Oxidized linalool 6.0% (Lin-OOHs 1%) pet. is a useful, standardized and stable tool for the detection of contact allergy in dermatitis patients. Many patients showing positive patch test reactions to oxidized linalool would not have been informed of their fragrance allergy if this specific test had not been performed.},
  author       = {Bråred Christensson, Johanna and Andersen, Klaus E and Bruze, Magnus and Johansen, Jeanne D and Garcia-Bravo, Begoña and Gimenez Arnau, Ana and Goh, Chee-Leok and Nixon, Rosemary and White, Ian R},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {247--259},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Air-oxidized linalool-a frequent cause of fragrance contact allergy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02134.x},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2012},
}