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Genetic risk scores ascertained in early adulthood and the prediction of type 2 diabetes later in life.

Franks, Paul LU (2012) In Diabetologia 55(10). p.2555-2558
Abstract
It is hoped that information garnered from studies on population genetics will one day be translated into a form in which it meaningfully improves the prediction, prevention or treatment of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes genetics researchers have made extraordinary progress in identifying common genetic variants that are associated with type 2 diabetes, which has shed light on the biological pathways in which molecular defects that cause the disease likely reside. However, the expectation that genetic discoveries will aid the prevention or treatment of type 2 diabetes has not, so far, been fulfilled. In a paper published in this edition of the journal, Vassy and colleagues (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2637-7) test the hypothesis that the... (More)
It is hoped that information garnered from studies on population genetics will one day be translated into a form in which it meaningfully improves the prediction, prevention or treatment of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes genetics researchers have made extraordinary progress in identifying common genetic variants that are associated with type 2 diabetes, which has shed light on the biological pathways in which molecular defects that cause the disease likely reside. However, the expectation that genetic discoveries will aid the prevention or treatment of type 2 diabetes has not, so far, been fulfilled. In a paper published in this edition of the journal, Vassy and colleagues (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2637-7) test the hypothesis that the predictive accuracy of established genetic risk markers for type 2 diabetes varies by age, with the predictive accuracy being greatest in younger cohorts. The authors found no substantive support for this hypothesis. However, a number of interesting questions are raised by their study concerning why risk alleles for a given genotype may differ in younger and older cohorts and why prospective cohort studies may yield results that are inconsistent with those derived from cross-sectional studies; this commentary discusses these points. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetologia
volume
55
issue
10
pages
2555 - 2558
publisher
Springer Verlag
external identifiers
  • wos:000308354600002
  • pmid:22878780
  • scopus:84866131770
ISSN
1432-0428
DOI
10.1007/s00125-012-2683-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
02e6c86b-145b-48c4-bdfd-2b709d533018 (old id 3047668)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22878780?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-09-05 10:08:51
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:35:49
@article{02e6c86b-145b-48c4-bdfd-2b709d533018,
  abstract     = {It is hoped that information garnered from studies on population genetics will one day be translated into a form in which it meaningfully improves the prediction, prevention or treatment of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes genetics researchers have made extraordinary progress in identifying common genetic variants that are associated with type 2 diabetes, which has shed light on the biological pathways in which molecular defects that cause the disease likely reside. However, the expectation that genetic discoveries will aid the prevention or treatment of type 2 diabetes has not, so far, been fulfilled. In a paper published in this edition of the journal, Vassy and colleagues (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2637-7) test the hypothesis that the predictive accuracy of established genetic risk markers for type 2 diabetes varies by age, with the predictive accuracy being greatest in younger cohorts. The authors found no substantive support for this hypothesis. However, a number of interesting questions are raised by their study concerning why risk alleles for a given genotype may differ in younger and older cohorts and why prospective cohort studies may yield results that are inconsistent with those derived from cross-sectional studies; this commentary discusses these points.},
  author       = {Franks, Paul},
  issn         = {1432-0428},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2555--2558},
  publisher    = {Springer Verlag},
  series       = {Diabetologia},
  title        = {Genetic risk scores ascertained in early adulthood and the prediction of type 2 diabetes later in life.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-012-2683-1},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2012},
}