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Repeated electroconvulsive seizures increase the number of vessel-associated macrophages in rat hippocampus.

Jansson, Linda LU ; Orre, Karin LU and Tingström, Anders LU (2012) In Journal of ECT 28(3). p.174-179
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:

We have previously reported that electroconvulsive seizure (ECS)-an animal model of the antidepressant treatment electroconvulsive therapy-causes glial cell activation in hippocampus and other limbic areas. In the current study, we have investigated whether the cellular response to ECS includes recruitment and infiltration of nonresident macrophages into the hippocampal brain parenchyma.



METHODS:

Adult rats received 1 ECS daily for 10 consecutive days and were then killed at different time points after the last ECS treatment. Brain sections were immunostained for laminin, a matrix protein expressed in the basal membrane of blood vessels, in combination with anti-CD163, which identifies... (More)
OBJECTIVES:

We have previously reported that electroconvulsive seizure (ECS)-an animal model of the antidepressant treatment electroconvulsive therapy-causes glial cell activation in hippocampus and other limbic areas. In the current study, we have investigated whether the cellular response to ECS includes recruitment and infiltration of nonresident macrophages into the hippocampal brain parenchyma.



METHODS:

Adult rats received 1 ECS daily for 10 consecutive days and were then killed at different time points after the last ECS treatment. Brain sections were immunostained for laminin, a matrix protein expressed in the basal membrane of blood vessels, in combination with anti-CD163, which identifies mature blood-borne macrophages. The number of CD163 cells in the hippocampus was quantified. We also investigated the number of vessel-associated cells expressing CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II). CD4 is mainly expressed by CD4 T cells, but can also be found on macrophages, monocytes, and activated microglia, whereas MHC II is expressed by macrophages, activated microglia, dendritic cells, and B cells.



RESULTS:

Our results demonstrate increased numbers of CD163 and CD4 cells following ECS. Most CD4 cells within the vasculature had a similar morphology to the CD163 macrophages. No CD163 cells were detected outside the vessels but a subpopulation of CD4 cells was seen in the brain parenchyma, here with a morphology resembling microglia. There was a transient increase in the number of blood vessel-associated MHC II cells following ECS.



CONCLUSIONS:

Our observations showed that the cellular response to ECS involves recruitment of blood-derived macrophages, but we could not see any infiltration into the brain parenchyma of these cells. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of ECT
volume
28
issue
3
pages
174 - 179
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000308188500015
  • pmid:22868491
  • scopus:84865781600
ISSN
1533-4112
DOI
10.1097/YCT.0b013e31824d1f82
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3c20916b-4fb9-4bb2-b5bc-f529acb792e4 (old id 3047752)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22868491?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-09-04 21:27:37
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:37:45
@article{3c20916b-4fb9-4bb2-b5bc-f529acb792e4,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES:<br/><br>
We have previously reported that electroconvulsive seizure (ECS)-an animal model of the antidepressant treatment electroconvulsive therapy-causes glial cell activation in hippocampus and other limbic areas. In the current study, we have investigated whether the cellular response to ECS includes recruitment and infiltration of nonresident macrophages into the hippocampal brain parenchyma.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS:<br/><br>
Adult rats received 1 ECS daily for 10 consecutive days and were then killed at different time points after the last ECS treatment. Brain sections were immunostained for laminin, a matrix protein expressed in the basal membrane of blood vessels, in combination with anti-CD163, which identifies mature blood-borne macrophages. The number of CD163 cells in the hippocampus was quantified. We also investigated the number of vessel-associated cells expressing CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II). CD4 is mainly expressed by CD4 T cells, but can also be found on macrophages, monocytes, and activated microglia, whereas MHC II is expressed by macrophages, activated microglia, dendritic cells, and B cells.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS:<br/><br>
Our results demonstrate increased numbers of CD163 and CD4 cells following ECS. Most CD4 cells within the vasculature had a similar morphology to the CD163 macrophages. No CD163 cells were detected outside the vessels but a subpopulation of CD4 cells was seen in the brain parenchyma, here with a morphology resembling microglia. There was a transient increase in the number of blood vessel-associated MHC II cells following ECS.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS:<br/><br>
Our observations showed that the cellular response to ECS involves recruitment of blood-derived macrophages, but we could not see any infiltration into the brain parenchyma of these cells.},
  author       = {Jansson, Linda and Orre, Karin and Tingström, Anders},
  issn         = {1533-4112},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {174--179},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of ECT},
  title        = {Repeated electroconvulsive seizures increase the number of vessel-associated macrophages in rat hippocampus.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/YCT.0b013e31824d1f82},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2012},
}