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The Chemical Composition of Some Archaeologically Significant Flint from Denmark and Sweden

Hughes, Richard; Högberg, Anders LU and Olausson, Deborah LU (2012) In Archaeometry 54(5). p.779-795
Abstract
Flint was the most widely employed raw material for artifact manufacture in Denmark and Sweden during the Stone Age, and it continued to be used during subsequent periods. Prehistoric flint mining and lithic manufacturing studies in these countries have attracted considerable attention, but there have been no recent attempts to chemically characterize the geologic source materials. This paper builds on a pilot study (Hughes et al. 2010) and uses energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDAX) analysis to determine quantitative composition estimates for nine major, minor and certain trace elements in seven archaeologically significant flint sources in Denmark and Sweden, along with new data on a number of other sources of prehistoric... (More)
Flint was the most widely employed raw material for artifact manufacture in Denmark and Sweden during the Stone Age, and it continued to be used during subsequent periods. Prehistoric flint mining and lithic manufacturing studies in these countries have attracted considerable attention, but there have been no recent attempts to chemically characterize the geologic source materials. This paper builds on a pilot study (Hughes et al. 2010) and uses energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDAX) analysis to determine quantitative composition estimates for nine major, minor and certain trace elements in seven archaeologically significant flint sources in Denmark and Sweden, along with new data on a number of other sources of prehistoric significance. These data provide a geochemical foundation for ongoing research devoted to determining contrasts and continuities in the time and space utilization of flint sources in Scandinavian prehistory. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Flint, geochemistry, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence, provenance analysis, Denmark, Sweden
in
Archaeometry
volume
54
issue
5
pages
779 - 795
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000308710100001
  • scopus:84866277247
ISSN
0003-813X
DOI
10.1111/j.1475-4754.2011.00655.x
project
Sourcing flint and flint artefacts from Sweden and Denmark by means of Non-Destructive Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDAX)
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c1264cb0-35af-495c-bf36-94007060cd10 (old id 3053578)
date added to LUP
2012-09-18 14:16:03
date last changed
2017-07-02 04:35:58
@article{c1264cb0-35af-495c-bf36-94007060cd10,
  abstract     = {Flint was the most widely employed raw material for artifact manufacture in Denmark and Sweden during the Stone Age, and it continued to be used during subsequent periods. Prehistoric flint mining and lithic manufacturing studies in these countries have attracted considerable attention, but there have been no recent attempts to chemically characterize the geologic source materials. This paper builds on a pilot study (Hughes et al. 2010) and uses energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDAX) analysis to determine quantitative composition estimates for nine major, minor and certain trace elements in seven archaeologically significant flint sources in Denmark and Sweden, along with new data on a number of other sources of prehistoric significance. These data provide a geochemical foundation for ongoing research devoted to determining contrasts and continuities in the time and space utilization of flint sources in Scandinavian prehistory.},
  author       = {Hughes, Richard and Högberg, Anders and Olausson, Deborah},
  issn         = {0003-813X},
  keyword      = {Flint,geochemistry,energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence,provenance analysis,Denmark,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {779--795},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Archaeometry},
  title        = {The Chemical Composition of Some Archaeologically Significant Flint from Denmark and Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-4754.2011.00655.x},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2012},
}