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Furniture dimensions and postural overload for schoolchildren's head, upper back and upper limbs

Batistao, Mariana Vieira; Sentanin, Anna Claudia; ShinoharaMoriguchi, Cristiane; Hansson, Gert-Åke LU ; Cote Gil Coury, Helenice Jane and Sato, Tatiana de Oliveira (2012) In Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation 41. p.4817-4824
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate how the fixed furniture dimensions match with students' anthropometry and to describe head, upper back and upper limbs postures and movements. Evaluation was performed in 48 students from a Brazilian state school. Furniture dimensions were measured with metric tape, movements and postures by inclinometers (Logger Tecknologi, Akarp, Sweden). Seat height was high for 21% and low for 36% of the students; seat length was short for 45% and long for 9% and table height was high for 53% and low for 28%. Regression analysis showed that seat/popliteal height quotient is explained by 90th percentile of upper back inclination (beta=0.410) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (beta=-0.293). For... (More)
The aim of this study was to evaluate how the fixed furniture dimensions match with students' anthropometry and to describe head, upper back and upper limbs postures and movements. Evaluation was performed in 48 students from a Brazilian state school. Furniture dimensions were measured with metric tape, movements and postures by inclinometers (Logger Tecknologi, Akarp, Sweden). Seat height was high for 21% and low for 36% of the students; seat length was short for 45% and long for 9% and table height was high for 53% and low for 28%. Regression analysis showed that seat/popliteal height quotient is explained by 90th percentile of upper back inclination (beta=0.410) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (beta=-0.293). For seat/thigh length quotient the significant variables were 90th percentile of upper back velocity (beta=-0.282) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (beta=0.410). This study showed a relationship between furniture mismatch and postural overload. When the seat height is low students increase upper back left inclination and right upper arm elevation; when the seat is short students decrease the upper back flexion velocity and increase right upper arm elevation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
classroom, anthropometry, children, direct measurement techniques, inclinometer
in
Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation
volume
41
pages
4817 - 4824
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000306361804153
  • scopus:84859860311
ISSN
1875-9270
DOI
10.3233/WOR-2012-0770-4817
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cdf56580-d00d-4166-8d3e-85da16f7d3ea (old id 3069377)
date added to LUP
2012-10-05 06:59:11
date last changed
2017-03-26 03:45:10
@article{cdf56580-d00d-4166-8d3e-85da16f7d3ea,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to evaluate how the fixed furniture dimensions match with students' anthropometry and to describe head, upper back and upper limbs postures and movements. Evaluation was performed in 48 students from a Brazilian state school. Furniture dimensions were measured with metric tape, movements and postures by inclinometers (Logger Tecknologi, Akarp, Sweden). Seat height was high for 21% and low for 36% of the students; seat length was short for 45% and long for 9% and table height was high for 53% and low for 28%. Regression analysis showed that seat/popliteal height quotient is explained by 90th percentile of upper back inclination (beta=0.410) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (beta=-0.293). For seat/thigh length quotient the significant variables were 90th percentile of upper back velocity (beta=-0.282) and 90th percentile of right upper arm elevation (beta=0.410). This study showed a relationship between furniture mismatch and postural overload. When the seat height is low students increase upper back left inclination and right upper arm elevation; when the seat is short students decrease the upper back flexion velocity and increase right upper arm elevation.},
  author       = {Batistao, Mariana Vieira and Sentanin, Anna Claudia and ShinoharaMoriguchi, Cristiane and Hansson, Gert-Åke and Cote Gil Coury, Helenice Jane and Sato, Tatiana de Oliveira},
  issn         = {1875-9270},
  keyword      = {classroom,anthropometry,children,direct measurement techniques,inclinometer},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {4817--4824},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment & Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Furniture dimensions and postural overload for schoolchildren's head, upper back and upper limbs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-2012-0770-4817},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2012},
}