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Yearly trend of dicarboxylic acids in organic aerosols from south of Sweden and source attribution

Hyder, Murtaza LU ; Genberg, Johan LU ; Sandahl, Margareta LU ; Swietlicki, Erik LU and Jönsson, Jan Åke LU (2012) In Atmospheric Environment 57. p.197-204
Abstract
Seven aliphatic dicarboxylic acids (C3-C9) along with phthalic acid, pinic acid and pinonic acid were determined in 35 aerosol (PM10) samples collected over the year at Vavihill sampling station in south of Sweden. Mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (ratio 1:3) was preferred over water for extraction of samples and extraction was assisted by ultrasonic agitation. Analytes were derivatized using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylsilyl chloride and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Among studied analytes, azelaic acid was found maximum with an average concentration of 6.0 +/- 3.6 ng m(-3) and minimum concentration was found for pimelic acid (1.06 +/- 0.63 ng m(-3)). A correlation... (More)
Seven aliphatic dicarboxylic acids (C3-C9) along with phthalic acid, pinic acid and pinonic acid were determined in 35 aerosol (PM10) samples collected over the year at Vavihill sampling station in south of Sweden. Mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (ratio 1:3) was preferred over water for extraction of samples and extraction was assisted by ultrasonic agitation. Analytes were derivatized using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylsilyl chloride and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Among studied analytes, azelaic acid was found maximum with an average concentration of 6.0 +/- 3.6 ng m(-3) and minimum concentration was found for pimelic acid (1.06 +/- 0.63 ng m(-3)). A correlation coefficients analysis was used for defining the possible sources of analytes. Higher dicarboxylic acids (C7-C9) showed a strong correlation with each other (correlation coefficients (r) range, 0.96-0.97). Pinic and pinonic acids showed an increase in concentration during summer. Lower carbon number dicarboxylic acids (C3-C6) and phthalic acid were found strongly correlated, but showed a poor correlation with higher carbon number dicarboxylic acids (C7-C9), suggesting a different source for them. Biomass burning, vehicle exhaust, photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (natural and anthropogenic emissions) were possible sources for dicarboxylic acids. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Dicarboxylic acids, Ultrasonic assisted solvent extraction, Correlation, coefficient, Biomass burning, Photo-oxidation, Phthalic acid, Pinonic, acid
in
Atmospheric Environment
volume
57
pages
197 - 204
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000307140100023
  • scopus:84861618294
ISSN
1352-2310
DOI
10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.04.027
project
MERGE
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9965d914-f015-43df-9a51-4a55aee8064c (old id 3069430)
date added to LUP
2012-09-27 13:11:20
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:05:23
@article{9965d914-f015-43df-9a51-4a55aee8064c,
  abstract     = {Seven aliphatic dicarboxylic acids (C3-C9) along with phthalic acid, pinic acid and pinonic acid were determined in 35 aerosol (PM10) samples collected over the year at Vavihill sampling station in south of Sweden. Mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (ratio 1:3) was preferred over water for extraction of samples and extraction was assisted by ultrasonic agitation. Analytes were derivatized using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylsilyl chloride and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Among studied analytes, azelaic acid was found maximum with an average concentration of 6.0 +/- 3.6 ng m(-3) and minimum concentration was found for pimelic acid (1.06 +/- 0.63 ng m(-3)). A correlation coefficients analysis was used for defining the possible sources of analytes. Higher dicarboxylic acids (C7-C9) showed a strong correlation with each other (correlation coefficients (r) range, 0.96-0.97). Pinic and pinonic acids showed an increase in concentration during summer. Lower carbon number dicarboxylic acids (C3-C6) and phthalic acid were found strongly correlated, but showed a poor correlation with higher carbon number dicarboxylic acids (C7-C9), suggesting a different source for them. Biomass burning, vehicle exhaust, photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (natural and anthropogenic emissions) were possible sources for dicarboxylic acids. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Hyder, Murtaza and Genberg, Johan and Sandahl, Margareta and Swietlicki, Erik and Jönsson, Jan Åke},
  issn         = {1352-2310},
  keyword      = {Dicarboxylic acids,Ultrasonic assisted solvent extraction,Correlation,coefficient,Biomass burning,Photo-oxidation,Phthalic acid,Pinonic,acid},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {197--204},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Atmospheric Environment},
  title        = {Yearly trend of dicarboxylic acids in organic aerosols from south of Sweden and source attribution},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.04.027},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2012},
}