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Nurse-led heart failure clinics improve survival and self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure - Results from a prospective, randomised trial

Stromberg, A; Martensson, J; Fridlund, Bengt LU ; Levin, LA; Karlsson, JE and Dahlstrom, U (2003) In European Heart Journal 24(11). p.1014-1023
Abstract
Aim The aim of this trial was to prospectively evaluate the effect of follow-up at a nurse-led heart failure clinic on mortality, morbidity and self-care behaviour for patients hospitalised due to heart failure for 12 months after discharge. Methods A total of 106 patients were randomly assigned to either follow-up at a nurse-led heart failure clinic or to usual care. The nurse-led heart failure clinic was staffed by specially educated and experienced cardiac nurses, delegated the responsibility for making protocol-led changes in medications. The first follow-up visit was 2-3 weeks after discharge. During the visit the nurse evaluated the heart failure status and the treatment, gave education about heart failure and social support to the... (More)
Aim The aim of this trial was to prospectively evaluate the effect of follow-up at a nurse-led heart failure clinic on mortality, morbidity and self-care behaviour for patients hospitalised due to heart failure for 12 months after discharge. Methods A total of 106 patients were randomly assigned to either follow-up at a nurse-led heart failure clinic or to usual care. The nurse-led heart failure clinic was staffed by specially educated and experienced cardiac nurses, delegated the responsibility for making protocol-led changes in medications. The first follow-up visit was 2-3 weeks after discharge. During the visit the nurse evaluated the heart failure status and the treatment, gave education about heart failure and social support to the patient and his family. Results There were fewer patients with events (death or admission) after 12 months in the intervention group compared to the control group (29 vs 40, p=0.03) and fewer deaths after 12 months (7 vs 20, p=0.005). The intervention group had fewer admissions (33 vs 56, p=0.047) and days in hospital (350 vs 592, p=0.045) during the first 3 months. After 12 months the intervention was associated with a 55% decrease in admissions/patient/month (0.18 vs 0.40, p=0.06) and fewer days in hospital/patient/month (1.4 vs 3.9, p=0.02). The intervention group had significantly higher self-care scores at 3 and 12 months compared to the control group (p=0.02 and p=0.01). Conclusions Follow up after hospitalisation at a nurse-Led heart failure clinic can improve survival and self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure as well as reduce the number of events, readmissions and days in hospital. (C) 2003 The European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
self-care, education, patient, nursing, mortality, heart failure, heart failure clinics
in
European Heart Journal
volume
24
issue
11
pages
1014 - 1023
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000183577800004
  • scopus:0038541583
ISSN
1522-9645
DOI
10.1016/S0195-668X(03)00112-X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6f6c4063-0366-45f5-81f7-71a2db437374 (old id 308554)
date added to LUP
2007-09-22 13:19:54
date last changed
2017-10-08 04:24:29
@article{6f6c4063-0366-45f5-81f7-71a2db437374,
  abstract     = {Aim The aim of this trial was to prospectively evaluate the effect of follow-up at a nurse-led heart failure clinic on mortality, morbidity and self-care behaviour for patients hospitalised due to heart failure for 12 months after discharge. Methods A total of 106 patients were randomly assigned to either follow-up at a nurse-led heart failure clinic or to usual care. The nurse-led heart failure clinic was staffed by specially educated and experienced cardiac nurses, delegated the responsibility for making protocol-led changes in medications. The first follow-up visit was 2-3 weeks after discharge. During the visit the nurse evaluated the heart failure status and the treatment, gave education about heart failure and social support to the patient and his family. Results There were fewer patients with events (death or admission) after 12 months in the intervention group compared to the control group (29 vs 40, p=0.03) and fewer deaths after 12 months (7 vs 20, p=0.005). The intervention group had fewer admissions (33 vs 56, p=0.047) and days in hospital (350 vs 592, p=0.045) during the first 3 months. After 12 months the intervention was associated with a 55% decrease in admissions/patient/month (0.18 vs 0.40, p=0.06) and fewer days in hospital/patient/month (1.4 vs 3.9, p=0.02). The intervention group had significantly higher self-care scores at 3 and 12 months compared to the control group (p=0.02 and p=0.01). Conclusions Follow up after hospitalisation at a nurse-Led heart failure clinic can improve survival and self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure as well as reduce the number of events, readmissions and days in hospital. (C) 2003 The European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Stromberg, A and Martensson, J and Fridlund, Bengt and Levin, LA and Karlsson, JE and Dahlstrom, U},
  issn         = {1522-9645},
  keyword      = {self-care,education,patient,nursing,mortality,heart failure,heart failure clinics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1014--1023},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Heart Journal},
  title        = {Nurse-led heart failure clinics improve survival and self-care behaviour in patients with heart failure - Results from a prospective, randomised trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0195-668X(03)00112-X},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2003},
}