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A study on the activation peptide released from procarboxypeptidase B (CAPAP) and anionic trypsinogen in patients with acute abdominal disorders of non-pancreatic origin

Muller, CA; Appelros, Stefan LU ; Uhl, W; Buchler, MW and Borgström, Anders LU (2003) In Pancreatology 3(2). p.149-155
Abstract
Background: The activation peptide released from procarboxypeptidase B, CAPAP, is a marker of the activation of pancreatic enzymes in acute pancreatitis while anionic trypsinogen (AT) levels in urine relate to leakage of unactivated proenzymes. Data on these markers in patients suffering from severe acute abdominal disorders of nonpancreatic origin are lacking. Purpose: To examine levels of CAPAP and AT in serum and urine from patients with severe acute abdominal disorders of non-pancreatic origin in order to better define the diagnostic specificity of these two markers in severe acute pancreatitis in relation to other acute intra-abdominal disorders. Subjects and Methods: The study included 54 patients with severe acute abdominal... (More)
Background: The activation peptide released from procarboxypeptidase B, CAPAP, is a marker of the activation of pancreatic enzymes in acute pancreatitis while anionic trypsinogen (AT) levels in urine relate to leakage of unactivated proenzymes. Data on these markers in patients suffering from severe acute abdominal disorders of nonpancreatic origin are lacking. Purpose: To examine levels of CAPAP and AT in serum and urine from patients with severe acute abdominal disorders of non-pancreatic origin in order to better define the diagnostic specificity of these two markers in severe acute pancreatitis in relation to other acute intra-abdominal disorders. Subjects and Methods: The study included 54 patients with severe acute abdominal disorders of non-pancreatic origin with an APACHE II score >3. Immunoreactive CAPAP (irCAPAP) and immunoreactive AT (irAT) were measured in serum and urine using specific immunoassays. Results: In urine, irCAPAP levels were mildly increased (>2 nmol/l) in 13% of the patients with severe acute abdominal diseases of non-pancreatic origin, but on no occasion did the increase approach the cutoff levels described for severe acute pancreatitis (>100 nmol/l). However, irAT levels in serum and urine were increased (>50 mug/l) in 54% of the cases. Conclusion: Contrary to what is found for irAT, patients with acute abdominal pain of non-pancreatic origin rarely have markedly increased levels of irCAPAP in serum and urine. Copyright (C) 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
anionic trypsinogen, activation peptide, carboxypeptidase B, CAPAP, acute pancreatitis
in
Pancreatology
volume
3
issue
2
pages
149 - 155
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000183154700010
  • scopus:0037719634
ISSN
1424-3903
DOI
10.1159/000070084
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
35242879-d6d4-438f-beea-ecbc9be8c219 (old id 309714)
date added to LUP
2007-08-03 13:52:11
date last changed
2018-01-07 05:11:06
@article{35242879-d6d4-438f-beea-ecbc9be8c219,
  abstract     = {Background: The activation peptide released from procarboxypeptidase B, CAPAP, is a marker of the activation of pancreatic enzymes in acute pancreatitis while anionic trypsinogen (AT) levels in urine relate to leakage of unactivated proenzymes. Data on these markers in patients suffering from severe acute abdominal disorders of nonpancreatic origin are lacking. Purpose: To examine levels of CAPAP and AT in serum and urine from patients with severe acute abdominal disorders of non-pancreatic origin in order to better define the diagnostic specificity of these two markers in severe acute pancreatitis in relation to other acute intra-abdominal disorders. Subjects and Methods: The study included 54 patients with severe acute abdominal disorders of non-pancreatic origin with an APACHE II score >3. Immunoreactive CAPAP (irCAPAP) and immunoreactive AT (irAT) were measured in serum and urine using specific immunoassays. Results: In urine, irCAPAP levels were mildly increased (>2 nmol/l) in 13% of the patients with severe acute abdominal diseases of non-pancreatic origin, but on no occasion did the increase approach the cutoff levels described for severe acute pancreatitis (>100 nmol/l). However, irAT levels in serum and urine were increased (>50 mug/l) in 54% of the cases. Conclusion: Contrary to what is found for irAT, patients with acute abdominal pain of non-pancreatic origin rarely have markedly increased levels of irCAPAP in serum and urine. Copyright (C) 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP.},
  author       = {Muller, CA and Appelros, Stefan and Uhl, W and Buchler, MW and Borgström, Anders},
  issn         = {1424-3903},
  keyword      = {anionic trypsinogen,activation peptide,carboxypeptidase B,CAPAP,acute pancreatitis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {149--155},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Pancreatology},
  title        = {A study on the activation peptide released from procarboxypeptidase B (CAPAP) and anionic trypsinogen in patients with acute abdominal disorders of non-pancreatic origin},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000070084},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2003},
}