Advanced

State Segmentation and Democratic Survival in Latin America

López, Matias LU (2020) In American Behavioral Scientist
Abstract

Popular models portray that high inequality induces elites to sponsor coups and reverse democratization as a means for repressing redistributive demands. Challenging this prediction, Latin America shifted from a historical pattern of systematic democratic breakdowns to one characterized by the resilience of democracy despite extreme levels of inequality. This article argues that the reminiscence of state-led repression under democracy explains why elites more regularly waive coups as solutions to distributive conflict in Latin American democracies. I call this state segmentation, a concept that describes the asymmetries between the enforcement of citizenship rights for those in privileged positions and for the poor. Wherever state... (More)

Popular models portray that high inequality induces elites to sponsor coups and reverse democratization as a means for repressing redistributive demands. Challenging this prediction, Latin America shifted from a historical pattern of systematic democratic breakdowns to one characterized by the resilience of democracy despite extreme levels of inequality. This article argues that the reminiscence of state-led repression under democracy explains why elites more regularly waive coups as solutions to distributive conflict in Latin American democracies. I call this state segmentation, a concept that describes the asymmetries between the enforcement of citizenship rights for those in privileged positions and for the poor. Wherever state segmentation is high, the odds of democratic breakdown should be lower. I test the argument using logistic regression models to predict the probability of coups and mandate interruptions considering different levels of state segmentation in Latin America using V-Dem data. Results show that asymmetries in access to citizenship rights indeed prevent democratic breakdowns.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
citizenship, democracy, elites, inequality, state segmentation
in
American Behavioral Scientist
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • scopus:85088562331
ISSN
0002-7642
DOI
10.1177/0002764220941244
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
30b0b0e8-d7f6-4de4-8aef-2ef4bb4d9568
date added to LUP
2020-08-05 12:48:19
date last changed
2020-08-12 09:09:43
@article{30b0b0e8-d7f6-4de4-8aef-2ef4bb4d9568,
  abstract     = {<p>Popular models portray that high inequality induces elites to sponsor coups and reverse democratization as a means for repressing redistributive demands. Challenging this prediction, Latin America shifted from a historical pattern of systematic democratic breakdowns to one characterized by the resilience of democracy despite extreme levels of inequality. This article argues that the reminiscence of state-led repression under democracy explains why elites more regularly waive coups as solutions to distributive conflict in Latin American democracies. I call this state segmentation, a concept that describes the asymmetries between the enforcement of citizenship rights for those in privileged positions and for the poor. Wherever state segmentation is high, the odds of democratic breakdown should be lower. I test the argument using logistic regression models to predict the probability of coups and mandate interruptions considering different levels of state segmentation in Latin America using V-Dem data. Results show that asymmetries in access to citizenship rights indeed prevent democratic breakdowns.</p>},
  author       = {López, Matias},
  issn         = {0002-7642},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  series       = {American Behavioral Scientist},
  title        = {State Segmentation and Democratic Survival in Latin America},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0002764220941244},
  doi          = {10.1177/0002764220941244},
  year         = {2020},
}