Advanced

Therapeutic potential of controlled drug delivery systems in neurodegenerative diseases.

Popovic, Natalija LU and Brundin, Patrik LU (2006) In International Journal of Pharmaceutics 314(2006 Mar 8). p.120-126
Abstract
Several compounds that exhibit a therapeutic effect in experimental models of neurodegenerative diseases have been identified over recent years. Safe and effective drug delivery to the central nervous system is still one of the main obstacles in translating these experimental strategies into clinical therapies. Different approaches have been developed to enable drug delivery in close proximity to the desired site of action. In this review, we describe biodegradable polymeric systems as drug carriers in models of neurodegenerative diseases. Biomaterials described for intracerebral drug delivery are well tolerated by the host tissue and do not exhibit cytotoxic, immunologic, carcinogenic or teratogenic effects even after chronic exposure.... (More)
Several compounds that exhibit a therapeutic effect in experimental models of neurodegenerative diseases have been identified over recent years. Safe and effective drug delivery to the central nervous system is still one of the main obstacles in translating these experimental strategies into clinical therapies. Different approaches have been developed to enable drug delivery in close proximity to the desired site of action. In this review, we describe biodegradable polymeric systems as drug carriers in models of neurodegenerative diseases. Biomaterials described for intracerebral drug delivery are well tolerated by the host tissue and do not exhibit cytotoxic, immunologic, carcinogenic or teratogenic effects even after chronic exposure. Behavioral improvement and normalization of brain morphology have been observed following treatment using such biomaterials in animal models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Application of these devices for neuroactive drugs is still restricted due to the relatively small volume of tissue exposed to active compound. Further development of polymeric drug delivery systems will require that larger volumes of brain tissue are targeted, with a controlled and sustained drug release that is carefully controlled so it does not cause damage to the surrounding tissue. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
biomaterials, microspheres, neurodegenerative diseases, nanoparticles, biocompatibility, rods
in
International Journal of Pharmaceutics
volume
314
issue
2006 Mar 8
pages
120 - 126
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000237905200003
  • scopus:33646473959
ISSN
1873-3476
DOI
10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.09.040
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
30d0ccb6-c634-40bf-a850-1a53a9365377 (old id 154735)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16529886&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-19 08:28:15
date last changed
2019-09-17 01:56:03
@article{30d0ccb6-c634-40bf-a850-1a53a9365377,
  abstract     = {Several compounds that exhibit a therapeutic effect in experimental models of neurodegenerative diseases have been identified over recent years. Safe and effective drug delivery to the central nervous system is still one of the main obstacles in translating these experimental strategies into clinical therapies. Different approaches have been developed to enable drug delivery in close proximity to the desired site of action. In this review, we describe biodegradable polymeric systems as drug carriers in models of neurodegenerative diseases. Biomaterials described for intracerebral drug delivery are well tolerated by the host tissue and do not exhibit cytotoxic, immunologic, carcinogenic or teratogenic effects even after chronic exposure. Behavioral improvement and normalization of brain morphology have been observed following treatment using such biomaterials in animal models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Application of these devices for neuroactive drugs is still restricted due to the relatively small volume of tissue exposed to active compound. Further development of polymeric drug delivery systems will require that larger volumes of brain tissue are targeted, with a controlled and sustained drug release that is carefully controlled so it does not cause damage to the surrounding tissue. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Popovic, Natalija and Brundin, Patrik},
  issn         = {1873-3476},
  keyword      = {biomaterials,microspheres,neurodegenerative diseases,nanoparticles,biocompatibility,rods},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2006 Mar 8},
  pages        = {120--126},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Pharmaceutics},
  title        = {Therapeutic potential of controlled drug delivery systems in neurodegenerative diseases.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.09.040},
  volume       = {314},
  year         = {2006},
}