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Factor V Leiden in pregnancies complicated by placental abruption

Prochazka, M; Happach, C; Marsal, Karel LU ; Dahlbäck, Björn LU and Lindqvist, Pelle LU (2003) In BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology2000-01-01+01:00 110(5). p.462-466
Abstract
Objective Recent studies suggest an increased prevalence of obstetric complications in female carriers of hereditary or acquired thrombophilias. The aim of the study was to determine if carriership of the factor V (FV) Leiden mutation (activated protein C [APC] resistance) is higher in women who have had of placental abruption during pregnancy. Design A retrospective case-control study. Setting University Hospital MAS, Malmo, Sweden. Methods A comparison of 102 women with placental abruption with 2371 prospectively collected controls. Carriership of FV Leiden was determined and the women were interviewed. Main outcome measures Proportion of FV Leiden carriership, first degree heritage of thrombosis and previous placental abruption in cases... (More)
Objective Recent studies suggest an increased prevalence of obstetric complications in female carriers of hereditary or acquired thrombophilias. The aim of the study was to determine if carriership of the factor V (FV) Leiden mutation (activated protein C [APC] resistance) is higher in women who have had of placental abruption during pregnancy. Design A retrospective case-control study. Setting University Hospital MAS, Malmo, Sweden. Methods A comparison of 102 women with placental abruption with 2371 prospectively collected controls. Carriership of FV Leiden was determined and the women were interviewed. Main outcome measures Proportion of FV Leiden carriership, first degree heritage of thrombosis and previous placental abruption in cases and controls. Results Carriage of FV Leiden was found in 15.7% of women who have had placental abruption as compared with 10.8% of controls (P = 0.12, odds ratio [OR] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.9-2.7). Around 20% of women with placental abruption reported first degree heritage for venous thrombosis, as compared with 6.7% of controls (P less than or equal to 0.001). Conclusions FV Leiden carriership was not significantly different in women with placental abruption. However, there was an increased prevalence of first degree heritage for venous thrombosis in women with placental abruption, indicating a higher prevalence of thrombophilia among women with placental abruption. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology2000-01-01+01:00
volume
110
issue
5
pages
462 - 466
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000182891400005
  • scopus:17944398370
ISSN
1471-0528
DOI
10.1016/S1470-0328(03)02969-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
39dbf71c-73f1-4dc1-874d-bbffbf91842f (old id 310991)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12742330
date added to LUP
2007-09-20 12:02:57
date last changed
2018-09-23 04:17:05
@article{39dbf71c-73f1-4dc1-874d-bbffbf91842f,
  abstract     = {Objective Recent studies suggest an increased prevalence of obstetric complications in female carriers of hereditary or acquired thrombophilias. The aim of the study was to determine if carriership of the factor V (FV) Leiden mutation (activated protein C [APC] resistance) is higher in women who have had of placental abruption during pregnancy. Design A retrospective case-control study. Setting University Hospital MAS, Malmo, Sweden. Methods A comparison of 102 women with placental abruption with 2371 prospectively collected controls. Carriership of FV Leiden was determined and the women were interviewed. Main outcome measures Proportion of FV Leiden carriership, first degree heritage of thrombosis and previous placental abruption in cases and controls. Results Carriage of FV Leiden was found in 15.7% of women who have had placental abruption as compared with 10.8% of controls (P = 0.12, odds ratio [OR] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.9-2.7). Around 20% of women with placental abruption reported first degree heritage for venous thrombosis, as compared with 6.7% of controls (P less than or equal to 0.001). Conclusions FV Leiden carriership was not significantly different in women with placental abruption. However, there was an increased prevalence of first degree heritage for venous thrombosis in women with placental abruption, indicating a higher prevalence of thrombophilia among women with placental abruption.},
  author       = {Prochazka, M and Happach, C and Marsal, Karel and Dahlbäck, Björn and Lindqvist, Pelle},
  issn         = {1471-0528},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {462--466},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology2000-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Factor V Leiden in pregnancies complicated by placental abruption},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-0328(03)02969-0},
  volume       = {110},
  year         = {2003},
}