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Model simulation of ultrafine particles inside a road tunnel

Gidhagen, L ; Johansson, C ; Strom, J ; Kristensson, Adam LU ; Swietlicki, Erik LU orcid ; Pirjola, L and Hansson, HC (2003) In Atmospheric Environment 37(15). p.2023-2036
Abstract
A monodispersive aerosol dynamic model, coupled to a 3D hydrodynamical grid model, has been used to study the dynamics of ultrafine particles inside a road tunnel in Stockholm, Sweden. The model results were compared to measured data of particle number concentrations, traffic intensity and tunnel ventilation rate. Coagulation and depositional losses to the tunnel walls were shown to be important processes during traffic peak hours, together contributing to losses of 77% of the particles smaller than 10nm and 41% of the particles of size 10-29nm. Particle growth due to water uptake or the presence of a micron-sized, resuspended particle fraction did not have any significant effect on the number of particles lost due to coagulation. Model... (More)
A monodispersive aerosol dynamic model, coupled to a 3D hydrodynamical grid model, has been used to study the dynamics of ultrafine particles inside a road tunnel in Stockholm, Sweden. The model results were compared to measured data of particle number concentrations, traffic intensity and tunnel ventilation rate. Coagulation and depositional losses to the tunnel walls were shown to be important processes during traffic peak hours, together contributing to losses of 77% of the particles smaller than 10nm and 41% of the particles of size 10-29nm. Particle growth due to water uptake or the presence of a micron-sized, resuspended particle fraction did not have any significant effect on the number of particles lost due to coagulation. Model simulation of particle number concentration response to temporal variations in traffic flow showed that constant emission factors could be used to reproduce the concentration variations of the particles larger than 29nm, while vehicle-speed-dependent factors are suggested to reproduce the variation of the smallest fractions. The emission factors for particle number concentrations estimated from the model simulation are in general higher and show a larger contribution from light-duty vehicles than what has been reported from a tunnel in California. The model study shows that combined measurements and model simulations in road tunnels can be used to improve the determinations of vehicle emission factors for ultrafine particles under realistic driving conditions. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
field, experiment, emission factors, vehicle emissions, aerosol model, CFD model
in
Atmospheric Environment
volume
37
issue
15
pages
2023 - 2036
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000182554100002
  • scopus:0037402620
ISSN
1352-2310
DOI
10.1016/S1352-2310(03)00124-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Nuclear Physics (Faculty of Technology) (011013007)
id
c3099212-e842-44f8-aa0e-dc4a7de0afdb (old id 312528)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 17:09:26
date last changed
2020-12-08 01:45:31
@article{c3099212-e842-44f8-aa0e-dc4a7de0afdb,
  abstract     = {A monodispersive aerosol dynamic model, coupled to a 3D hydrodynamical grid model, has been used to study the dynamics of ultrafine particles inside a road tunnel in Stockholm, Sweden. The model results were compared to measured data of particle number concentrations, traffic intensity and tunnel ventilation rate. Coagulation and depositional losses to the tunnel walls were shown to be important processes during traffic peak hours, together contributing to losses of 77% of the particles smaller than 10nm and 41% of the particles of size 10-29nm. Particle growth due to water uptake or the presence of a micron-sized, resuspended particle fraction did not have any significant effect on the number of particles lost due to coagulation. Model simulation of particle number concentration response to temporal variations in traffic flow showed that constant emission factors could be used to reproduce the concentration variations of the particles larger than 29nm, while vehicle-speed-dependent factors are suggested to reproduce the variation of the smallest fractions. The emission factors for particle number concentrations estimated from the model simulation are in general higher and show a larger contribution from light-duty vehicles than what has been reported from a tunnel in California. The model study shows that combined measurements and model simulations in road tunnels can be used to improve the determinations of vehicle emission factors for ultrafine particles under realistic driving conditions. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Gidhagen, L and Johansson, C and Strom, J and Kristensson, Adam and Swietlicki, Erik and Pirjola, L and Hansson, HC},
  issn         = {1352-2310},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {15},
  pages        = {2023--2036},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Atmospheric Environment},
  title        = {Model simulation of ultrafine particles inside a road tunnel},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1352-2310(03)00124-9},
  doi          = {10.1016/S1352-2310(03)00124-9},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2003},
}