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Interatrial blocks. A separate entity from left atrial enlargement: a consensus report

Bayes de Luna, Antonio; Platonov, Pyotr LU ; Cosio, Francisco G.; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Pastore, Carlos; Baranowski, Rafa; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Guindo, Josep; Vinolas, Xavier and Garcia-Niebla, Javier, et al. (2012) In Journal of Electrocardiology 45(5). p.445-451
Abstract
Impaired interatrial conduction or interatrial block is well documented but is not described as an individual electrocardiographic (ECG) pattern in most of ECG books, although the term atrial abnormalities to encompass both concepts, left atrial enlargement (LAE) and interatrial block, has been coined. In fact, LAE and interatrial block are often associated, similarly to what happens with ventricular enlargement and ventricular block. The interatrial blocks, that is, the presence of delay of conduction between the right and left atria, are the most frequent atrial blocks. These may be of first degree (P-wave duration > 120 milliseconds), third degree (longer P wave with biphasic [+/-] morphology in inferior leads), and second degree... (More)
Impaired interatrial conduction or interatrial block is well documented but is not described as an individual electrocardiographic (ECG) pattern in most of ECG books, although the term atrial abnormalities to encompass both concepts, left atrial enlargement (LAE) and interatrial block, has been coined. In fact, LAE and interatrial block are often associated, similarly to what happens with ventricular enlargement and ventricular block. The interatrial blocks, that is, the presence of delay of conduction between the right and left atria, are the most frequent atrial blocks. These may be of first degree (P-wave duration > 120 milliseconds), third degree (longer P wave with biphasic [+/-] morphology in inferior leads), and second degree when these patterns appear transiently in the same ECG recording (atrial aberrancy). There are evidences that these electrocardiographic P-wave patterns are due to a block because they may (a) appear transiently, (b) be without associated atrial enlargement, and (c) may be reproduced experimentally. The presence of interatrial blocks may be seen in the absence of atrial enlargement but often are present in case of LAE. The most important clinical implications of interatrial block are the following: (a) the first degree interatrial blocks are very common, and their relation with atrial fibrillation and an increased risk for global and cardiovascular mortality has been demonstrated; (b) the third degree interatrial blocks are less frequent but are strong markers of LAE and paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Their presence has been considered a true arrhythmological syndrome. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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keywords
Interatrial blocks, Left atrial enlargement, Atrial abnormalities
in
Journal of Electrocardiology
volume
45
issue
5
pages
445 - 451
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000308621400004
  • scopus:84865448440
ISSN
1532-8430
DOI
10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2012.06.029
language
English
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yes
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89b5d9db-4fc9-4266-abcb-0ea410f6e774 (old id 3139225)
date added to LUP
2012-11-01 11:25:47
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2017-10-08 03:19:32
@article{89b5d9db-4fc9-4266-abcb-0ea410f6e774,
  abstract     = {Impaired interatrial conduction or interatrial block is well documented but is not described as an individual electrocardiographic (ECG) pattern in most of ECG books, although the term atrial abnormalities to encompass both concepts, left atrial enlargement (LAE) and interatrial block, has been coined. In fact, LAE and interatrial block are often associated, similarly to what happens with ventricular enlargement and ventricular block. The interatrial blocks, that is, the presence of delay of conduction between the right and left atria, are the most frequent atrial blocks. These may be of first degree (P-wave duration > 120 milliseconds), third degree (longer P wave with biphasic [+/-] morphology in inferior leads), and second degree when these patterns appear transiently in the same ECG recording (atrial aberrancy). There are evidences that these electrocardiographic P-wave patterns are due to a block because they may (a) appear transiently, (b) be without associated atrial enlargement, and (c) may be reproduced experimentally. The presence of interatrial blocks may be seen in the absence of atrial enlargement but often are present in case of LAE. The most important clinical implications of interatrial block are the following: (a) the first degree interatrial blocks are very common, and their relation with atrial fibrillation and an increased risk for global and cardiovascular mortality has been demonstrated; (b) the third degree interatrial blocks are less frequent but are strong markers of LAE and paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Their presence has been considered a true arrhythmological syndrome. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Bayes de Luna, Antonio and Platonov, Pyotr and Cosio, Francisco G. and Cygankiewicz, Iwona and Pastore, Carlos and Baranowski, Rafa and Bayes-Genis, Antoni and Guindo, Josep and Vinolas, Xavier and Garcia-Niebla, Javier and Barbosa, Raimundo and Stern, Shlomo and Spodick, David},
  issn         = {1532-8430},
  keyword      = {Interatrial blocks,Left atrial enlargement,Atrial abnormalities},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {445--451},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Electrocardiology},
  title        = {Interatrial blocks. A separate entity from left atrial enlargement: a consensus report},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2012.06.029},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2012},
}