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Governing climate change transnationally: assessing the evidence from a database of sixty initiatives

Bulkeley, Harriet; Andonova, Liliana; Bäckstrand, Karin LU ; Betsill, Michele; Compagnon, Daniel; Duffy, Rosaleen; Kolk, Ans; Hoffmann, Matthew; Levy, David and Newell, Peter, et al. (2012) In Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy 30(4). p.591-612
Abstract
With this paper we present an analysis of sixty transnational governance initiatives and assess the implications for our understanding of the roles of public and private actors, the legitimacy of governance 'beyond' the state, and the North-South dimensions of governing climate change. In the first part of the paper we examine the notion of transnational governance and its applicability in the climate change arena, reflecting on the history and emergence of transnational governance initiatives in this issue area and key areas of debate. In the second part of the paper we present the findings from the database and its analysis. Focusing on three core issues, the roles of public and private actors in governing transnationally, the functions... (More)
With this paper we present an analysis of sixty transnational governance initiatives and assess the implications for our understanding of the roles of public and private actors, the legitimacy of governance 'beyond' the state, and the North-South dimensions of governing climate change. In the first part of the paper we examine the notion of transnational governance and its applicability in the climate change arena, reflecting on the history and emergence of transnational governance initiatives in this issue area and key areas of debate. In the second part of the paper we present the findings from the database and its analysis. Focusing on three core issues, the roles of public and private actors in governing transnationally, the functions that such initiatives perform, and the ways in which accountability for governing global environmental issues might be achieved, we suggest that significant distinctions are emerging in the universe of transnational climate governance which may have considerable implications for the governing of global environmental issues. In conclusion, we reflect on these findings and the subsequent consequences for the governance of climate change. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
climate change, governance, transnational, private authority, public, legitimacy
in
Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy
volume
30
issue
4
pages
591 - 612
publisher
Pion Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000308474200003
  • scopus:84865816019
ISSN
1472-3425
DOI
10.1068/c11126
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6fa8e343-4cef-4227-8eee-c33fbe41c7d0 (old id 3147381)
date added to LUP
2012-11-16 08:57:43
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:52:03
@article{6fa8e343-4cef-4227-8eee-c33fbe41c7d0,
  abstract     = {With this paper we present an analysis of sixty transnational governance initiatives and assess the implications for our understanding of the roles of public and private actors, the legitimacy of governance 'beyond' the state, and the North-South dimensions of governing climate change. In the first part of the paper we examine the notion of transnational governance and its applicability in the climate change arena, reflecting on the history and emergence of transnational governance initiatives in this issue area and key areas of debate. In the second part of the paper we present the findings from the database and its analysis. Focusing on three core issues, the roles of public and private actors in governing transnationally, the functions that such initiatives perform, and the ways in which accountability for governing global environmental issues might be achieved, we suggest that significant distinctions are emerging in the universe of transnational climate governance which may have considerable implications for the governing of global environmental issues. In conclusion, we reflect on these findings and the subsequent consequences for the governance of climate change.},
  author       = {Bulkeley, Harriet and Andonova, Liliana and Bäckstrand, Karin and Betsill, Michele and Compagnon, Daniel and Duffy, Rosaleen and Kolk, Ans and Hoffmann, Matthew and Levy, David and Newell, Peter and Milledge, Tori and Paterson, Matthew and Pattberg, Philipp and VanDeveer, Stacy},
  issn         = {1472-3425},
  keyword      = {climate change,governance,transnational,private authority,public,legitimacy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {591--612},
  publisher    = {Pion Ltd},
  series       = {Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy},
  title        = {Governing climate change transnationally: assessing the evidence from a database of sixty initiatives},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1068/c11126},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2012},
}