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Rangeland development of the Mu Us sandy land in semiarid China: An analysis using landsat and NOAA remote sensing data

Runnström, Micael LU (2003) In Land Degradation and Development 14(2). p.189-202
Abstract
Degradation of the dry semiarid ecosystems in the Mu Us Sandy Land of north central China was explored using high-resolution satellite images from 1978, 1987 and 1996. This study monitored both changes in grassland biomass production and reclamation activities to detect the nature and scale of land degradation since major economic reforms were introduced in 1978. The position of the high-resolution images within the vegetation cycles was inspected from National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NDVI images at 10-day repetition and seasonal precipitation patterns. A model was developed to categorize changes in the vegetation signal activity from 30 x 30 m pixels into vegetation cover development and land-use changes... (More)
Degradation of the dry semiarid ecosystems in the Mu Us Sandy Land of north central China was explored using high-resolution satellite images from 1978, 1987 and 1996. This study monitored both changes in grassland biomass production and reclamation activities to detect the nature and scale of land degradation since major economic reforms were introduced in 1978. The position of the high-resolution images within the vegetation cycles was inspected from National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NDVI images at 10-day repetition and seasonal precipitation patterns. A model was developed to categorize changes in the vegetation signal activity from 30 x 30 m pixels into vegetation cover development and land-use changes between 1987 and 1996. A general increase of biomass production was evident despite the rapid increase in numbers of grazing animals. This increase in biomass was confirmed by the NOAA time series, which also revealed annual variability related to the amount and pattern of the seasonal rains. Rangeland conversion to farmland was detected, and this process has increased the area of cultivation almost fivefold. The classified area of cultivation corresponds with reported statistical records, also showing that irrigation features in virtually 100 per cent of the sown area. Signs of declining biological production, indicating land degradation processes, are few. Biomass production has increased, with a gain in the economic output from both crop and animal production. The early start of active measures to halt desertification has increased vegetation cover and lowered wind erosion potential and grasslands seems to be managing the high levels of grazing pressure. Copyright (C) 2003 John Wiley Sons, Ltd. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
China, Mu Us, NDVI, NOAA, Landsat TM, remote sensing, land degradation, desertification, Inner Mongolia, Ordos
in
Land Degradation and Development
volume
14
issue
2
pages
189 - 202
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000182130200002
  • scopus:0037358123
ISSN
1099-145X
DOI
10.1002/ldr.545
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8ee6084d-fd2c-46df-b576-f80fb4e2b2de (old id 314870)
date added to LUP
2007-09-20 19:27:24
date last changed
2018-09-23 03:33:12
@article{8ee6084d-fd2c-46df-b576-f80fb4e2b2de,
  abstract     = {Degradation of the dry semiarid ecosystems in the Mu Us Sandy Land of north central China was explored using high-resolution satellite images from 1978, 1987 and 1996. This study monitored both changes in grassland biomass production and reclamation activities to detect the nature and scale of land degradation since major economic reforms were introduced in 1978. The position of the high-resolution images within the vegetation cycles was inspected from National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NDVI images at 10-day repetition and seasonal precipitation patterns. A model was developed to categorize changes in the vegetation signal activity from 30 x 30 m pixels into vegetation cover development and land-use changes between 1987 and 1996. A general increase of biomass production was evident despite the rapid increase in numbers of grazing animals. This increase in biomass was confirmed by the NOAA time series, which also revealed annual variability related to the amount and pattern of the seasonal rains. Rangeland conversion to farmland was detected, and this process has increased the area of cultivation almost fivefold. The classified area of cultivation corresponds with reported statistical records, also showing that irrigation features in virtually 100 per cent of the sown area. Signs of declining biological production, indicating land degradation processes, are few. Biomass production has increased, with a gain in the economic output from both crop and animal production. The early start of active measures to halt desertification has increased vegetation cover and lowered wind erosion potential and grasslands seems to be managing the high levels of grazing pressure. Copyright (C) 2003 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Runnström, Micael},
  issn         = {1099-145X},
  keyword      = {China,Mu Us,NDVI,NOAA,Landsat TM,remote sensing,land degradation,desertification,Inner Mongolia,Ordos},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {189--202},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Land Degradation and Development},
  title        = {Rangeland development of the Mu Us sandy land in semiarid China: An analysis using landsat and NOAA remote sensing data},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ldr.545},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2003},
}