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Life satisfaction and self-reported impairments in persons with late effects of polio.

Lexell, Jan LU and Brogårdh, Christina LU (2012) In Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 55. p.577-589
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Decades after an acute poliomyelitis infection many persons experience new symptoms or impairments which may affect their life satisfaction. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between life satisfaction and self-reported impairments in persons with late effects of polio. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and sixty-nine persons (104women and 65men) with prior polio responded on admission to rehabilitation to the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11) assessing satisfaction with life as a whole and 10 domains of life satisfaction and to a 13-item questionnaire assessing self-reported impairments related to late effects of polio. RESULTS: A majority was to some degree satisfied with life as a whole... (More)
OBJECTIVE: Decades after an acute poliomyelitis infection many persons experience new symptoms or impairments which may affect their life satisfaction. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between life satisfaction and self-reported impairments in persons with late effects of polio. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and sixty-nine persons (104women and 65men) with prior polio responded on admission to rehabilitation to the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11) assessing satisfaction with life as a whole and 10 domains of life satisfaction and to a 13-item questionnaire assessing self-reported impairments related to late effects of polio. RESULTS: A majority was to some degree satisfied with life as a whole and with all 10 domains of life satisfaction in LiSat-11, but less than 20% was very satisfied or satisfied with their somatic health. Muscle fatigue, muscle weakness, general fatigue, muscle and/or joint pain during physical activity and cold intolerance were the most frequently reported impairments. Overall, those who rated themselves as not satisfied (according to LiSat-11) reported significantly higher degrees of impairment than those who were satisfied. The relationships between the items of life satisfaction in LiSat-11 and the items in the self-report questionnaire varied from -0.01 to -0.64. CONCLUSION: Satisfaction with life as a whole, and different domains of life satisfaction are low to moderately associated with self-reported impairments. This implies that rehabilitation interventions must address not only self-reported impairments but also activity limitations and participation restrictions in order to enhance life satisfaction in people with late effects of polio. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
volume
55
pages
577 - 589
publisher
Elsevier Masson
external identifiers
  • pmid:23021942
  • scopus:84870807528
ISSN
1877-0657
DOI
10.1016/j.rehab.2012.08.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ad631523-c232-4cdb-afc8-73ac4e70430b (old id 3161388)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23021942?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-11-01 11:40:52
date last changed
2017-10-29 04:30:04
@article{ad631523-c232-4cdb-afc8-73ac4e70430b,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: Decades after an acute poliomyelitis infection many persons experience new symptoms or impairments which may affect their life satisfaction. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between life satisfaction and self-reported impairments in persons with late effects of polio. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred and sixty-nine persons (104women and 65men) with prior polio responded on admission to rehabilitation to the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11) assessing satisfaction with life as a whole and 10 domains of life satisfaction and to a 13-item questionnaire assessing self-reported impairments related to late effects of polio. RESULTS: A majority was to some degree satisfied with life as a whole and with all 10 domains of life satisfaction in LiSat-11, but less than 20% was very satisfied or satisfied with their somatic health. Muscle fatigue, muscle weakness, general fatigue, muscle and/or joint pain during physical activity and cold intolerance were the most frequently reported impairments. Overall, those who rated themselves as not satisfied (according to LiSat-11) reported significantly higher degrees of impairment than those who were satisfied. The relationships between the items of life satisfaction in LiSat-11 and the items in the self-report questionnaire varied from -0.01 to -0.64. CONCLUSION: Satisfaction with life as a whole, and different domains of life satisfaction are low to moderately associated with self-reported impairments. This implies that rehabilitation interventions must address not only self-reported impairments but also activity limitations and participation restrictions in order to enhance life satisfaction in people with late effects of polio.},
  author       = {Lexell, Jan and Brogårdh, Christina},
  issn         = {1877-0657},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {577--589},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Masson},
  series       = {Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine},
  title        = {Life satisfaction and self-reported impairments in persons with late effects of polio.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rehab.2012.08.006},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2012},
}