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Industrial Societies

Hornborg, Alf LU (2015) In International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences 11. p.863-867
Abstract
The concept of ‘industrial society’ is generally used for a type of social organization based on mass production of commodities. This type of societies began to dominate Western Europe toward the end of the eighteenth century, reflecting a strategy to expand export production in order to appropriate embodied labor and resources from elsewhere in the world-system. Perceived as progress and ‘development,’ this transition has shaped hegemonic worldviews and visions of a desirable future for all humankind, but current concerns with inequalities, resource depletion, and climate change suggest that such aspirations are not globally sustainable. Industrialization and urbanization tend to fundamentally transform sociocultural conditions and... (More)
The concept of ‘industrial society’ is generally used for a type of social organization based on mass production of commodities. This type of societies began to dominate Western Europe toward the end of the eighteenth century, reflecting a strategy to expand export production in order to appropriate embodied labor and resources from elsewhere in the world-system. Perceived as progress and ‘development,’ this transition has shaped hegemonic worldviews and visions of a desirable future for all humankind, but current concerns with inequalities, resource depletion, and climate change suggest that such aspirations are not globally sustainable. Industrialization and urbanization tend to fundamentally transform sociocultural conditions and human–environmental relations. Anthropological perspectives can illuminate how the cultural inclinations and self-representations of industrial societies are geared to global political economy, sociology, and ecology. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences
editor
Wright, James D. and
volume
11
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85043428649
ISBN
978-0-08-043076-8
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.12200-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
78e87396-8ada-4f81-a1ac-0dc1bdbc25a6 (old id 3168667)
date added to LUP
2012-11-19 11:35:44
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:07:11
@inbook{78e87396-8ada-4f81-a1ac-0dc1bdbc25a6,
  abstract     = {The concept of ‘industrial society’ is generally used for a type of social organization based on mass production of commodities. This type of societies began to dominate Western Europe toward the end of the eighteenth century, reflecting a strategy to expand export production in order to appropriate embodied labor and resources from elsewhere in the world-system. Perceived as progress and ‘development,’ this transition has shaped hegemonic worldviews and visions of a desirable future for all humankind, but current concerns with inequalities, resource depletion, and climate change suggest that such aspirations are not globally sustainable. Industrialization and urbanization tend to fundamentally transform sociocultural conditions and human–environmental relations. Anthropological perspectives can illuminate how the cultural inclinations and self-representations of industrial societies are geared to global political economy, sociology, and ecology.},
  author       = {Hornborg, Alf},
  editor       = {Wright, James D.},
  isbn         = {978-0-08-043076-8},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {863--867},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences},
  title        = {Industrial Societies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.12200-7},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2015},
}