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Nondigestible carbohydrates in the diets of infants and young children: A commentary by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition

Aggett, PJ; Agostoni, C; Axelsson, Irene LU ; Edwards, CA; Goulet, O; Hernell, O; Koletzko, B; Lafeber, HN; Micheli, JL and Michaelsen, KF, et al. (2003) In Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Jpgn 36(3). p.329-337
Abstract
The consumption of nondigestible carbohydrates is perceived as beneficial by health professionals and the general public, but the translation of this information into dietary practice, public health recommendations, and regulatory policy has proved difficult. Nondiaestible carbohydrates are a heterogeneous entity, and their definition is problematic. Without a means to characterize the dietary components associated with particular health benefits, specific attributions of these cannot be made. Food labeling for "fiber" constituents can be given only in a general context, and the development of health policy, dietary advice, and education, and informed public understanding of nondigestible carbohydrates are limited. There have, however,... (More)
The consumption of nondigestible carbohydrates is perceived as beneficial by health professionals and the general public, but the translation of this information into dietary practice, public health recommendations, and regulatory policy has proved difficult. Nondiaestible carbohydrates are a heterogeneous entity, and their definition is problematic. Without a means to characterize the dietary components associated with particular health benefits, specific attributions of these cannot be made. Food labeling for "fiber" constituents can be given only in a general context, and the development of health policy, dietary advice, and education, and informed public understanding of nondigestible carbohydrates are limited. There have, however, been several important developments in our thinking about nondigestible carbohydrates during the past few years. The concept of fiber has expanded to include a range of nondigestible carbohydrates. Their fermentation, fate, and effects in the colon have become a defining characteristic; human milk, hitherto regarded as devoid of nondigestible carbo-hydrates, is now recognized as a source for infants, and the inclusion of nondigestible carbohydrates in the diet has been promoted for their "prebiotic" effects. Therefore, a review of the importance of nondigestible carbohydrates in the diets of infants and young children is timely. The aims of this commentary are to clarify the current definitions of nondigestible carbohydrates, to review published evidence for their biochemical, physiologic, nutritional, and clinical effects, and to discuss issues involved in defining dietary guidelines for infants and young children. (C) 2003 Lippincott Williams Wilkins, Inc. (Less)
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published
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Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Jpgn
volume
36
issue
3
pages
329 - 337
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:12604970
  • wos:000181292700006
  • scopus:0042634277
ISSN
1536-4801
language
English
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yes
id
eee899e0-5e4b-4484-9a64-8d7435c599ce (old id 317240)
alternative location
http://jpgn.org/
date added to LUP
2007-08-22 07:30:39
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:29:51
@article{eee899e0-5e4b-4484-9a64-8d7435c599ce,
  abstract     = {The consumption of nondigestible carbohydrates is perceived as beneficial by health professionals and the general public, but the translation of this information into dietary practice, public health recommendations, and regulatory policy has proved difficult. Nondiaestible carbohydrates are a heterogeneous entity, and their definition is problematic. Without a means to characterize the dietary components associated with particular health benefits, specific attributions of these cannot be made. Food labeling for "fiber" constituents can be given only in a general context, and the development of health policy, dietary advice, and education, and informed public understanding of nondigestible carbohydrates are limited. There have, however, been several important developments in our thinking about nondigestible carbohydrates during the past few years. The concept of fiber has expanded to include a range of nondigestible carbohydrates. Their fermentation, fate, and effects in the colon have become a defining characteristic; human milk, hitherto regarded as devoid of nondigestible carbo-hydrates, is now recognized as a source for infants, and the inclusion of nondigestible carbohydrates in the diet has been promoted for their "prebiotic" effects. Therefore, a review of the importance of nondigestible carbohydrates in the diets of infants and young children is timely. The aims of this commentary are to clarify the current definitions of nondigestible carbohydrates, to review published evidence for their biochemical, physiologic, nutritional, and clinical effects, and to discuss issues involved in defining dietary guidelines for infants and young children. (C) 2003 Lippincott Williams Wilkins, Inc.},
  author       = {Aggett, PJ and Agostoni, C and Axelsson, Irene and Edwards, CA and Goulet, O and Hernell, O and Koletzko, B and Lafeber, HN and Micheli, JL and Michaelsen, KF and Rigo, J and Szajewska, H and Weaver, LT},
  issn         = {1536-4801},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {329--337},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Jpgn},
  title        = {Nondigestible carbohydrates in the diets of infants and young children: A commentary by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2003},
}