Advanced

Alternative Fuels for Particulate Control in CI Engines

Shamun, Sam LU ; Garcia, Pablo LU and Svensson, Erik LU (2018) p.181-181
Abstract (Swedish)
It is widely known that diesel combustion in a compression ignition (CI) engine produces and emits a significant amount of particulate matter (PM) which contributes to degradation in both health and environment. The origin of the soot formation depends on several factors, however, the main source of the soot emissions is the combustion of the diesel fuel itself. To circumvent this issue, studies have been conducted to explore and exploit the advantages of fuels with a lower sooting tendency. Around the world, the utilization of oxygenated biodiesels, such as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), have been increasing to allow the reduction of PM emissions alongside the net CO2. Due to the FAMEs oxygen content, the fuel is oxidized more readily... (More)
It is widely known that diesel combustion in a compression ignition (CI) engine produces and emits a significant amount of particulate matter (PM) which contributes to degradation in both health and environment. The origin of the soot formation depends on several factors, however, the main source of the soot emissions is the combustion of the diesel fuel itself. To circumvent this issue, studies have been conducted to explore and exploit the advantages of fuels with a lower sooting tendency. Around the world, the utilization of oxygenated biodiesels, such as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), have been increasing to allow the reduction of PM emissions alongside the net CO2. Due to the FAMEs oxygen content, the fuel is oxidized more readily during the combustion process and thus emitting a significantly lower engine out concentration of PM emission than that of commercial diesel fuel. The utilization of the lighter alcohol fuels, methanol and ethanol neat and blended, is a good option to reduce the soot to zero levels. The reduction of soot to near zero levels introduces another advantage; the soot-NOx trade-off diminishes completely when utilizing exhaust gas recycling (EGR). The issue, however, is that the PN emission of nucleation mode particles is high when utilizing such fuels while ignition is hard to achieve with high octane number fuels in a CI engine. (Less)
Abstract
It is widely known that diesel combustion in a compression ignition (CI) engine produces and emits a significant amount of particulate matter (PM) which contributes to degradation in both health and environment. The origin of the soot formation depends on several factors, however, the main source of the soot emissions is the combustion of the diesel fuel itself. To circumvent this issue, studies have been conducted to explore and exploit the advantages of fuels with a lower sooting tendency. Around the world, the utilization of oxygenated biodiesels, such as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), have been increasing to allow the reduction of PM emissions alongside the net CO2. Due to the FAMEs oxygen content, the fuel is oxidized more readily... (More)
It is widely known that diesel combustion in a compression ignition (CI) engine produces and emits a significant amount of particulate matter (PM) which contributes to degradation in both health and environment. The origin of the soot formation depends on several factors, however, the main source of the soot emissions is the combustion of the diesel fuel itself. To circumvent this issue, studies have been conducted to explore and exploit the advantages of fuels with a lower sooting tendency. Around the world, the utilization of oxygenated biodiesels, such as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), have been increasing to allow the reduction of PM emissions alongside the net CO2. Due to the FAMEs oxygen content, the fuel is oxidized more readily during the combustion process and thus emitting a significantly lower engine out concentration of PM emission than that of commercial diesel fuel. The utilization of the lighter alcohol fuels, methanol and ethanol neat and blended, is a good option to reduce the soot to zero levels. The reduction of soot to near zero levels introduces another advantage; the soot-NOx trade-off diminishes completely when utilizing exhaust gas recycling (EGR). The issue, however, is that the PN emission of nucleation mode particles is high when utilizing such fuels while ignition is hard to achieve with high octane number fuels in a CI engine. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Biodiesel, Metanol, Etanol, Soot, Partiklar
host publication
Engine Exhaust Particulates
pages
197 pages
publisher
Springer
ISBN
978-981-13-3298-2
Online ISBN 978-981-13-3299-9
DOI
10.1007/978-981-13-3299-9_9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
31739a36-88b1-4ca2-a867-7b43d2cdcc00
alternative location
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811332982
date added to LUP
2018-11-27 13:37:30
date last changed
2018-12-19 14:37:40
@inbook{31739a36-88b1-4ca2-a867-7b43d2cdcc00,
  abstract     = {It is widely known that diesel combustion in a compression ignition (CI) engine produces and emits a significant amount of particulate matter (PM) which contributes to degradation in both health and environment. The origin of the soot formation depends on several factors, however, the main source of the soot emissions is the combustion of the diesel fuel itself. To circumvent this issue, studies have been conducted to explore and exploit the advantages of fuels with a lower sooting tendency. Around the world, the utilization of oxygenated biodiesels, such as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), have been increasing to allow the reduction of PM emissions alongside the net CO2. Due to the FAMEs oxygen content, the fuel is oxidized more readily during the combustion process and thus emitting a significantly lower engine out concentration of PM emission than that of commercial diesel fuel. The utilization of the lighter alcohol fuels, methanol and ethanol neat and blended, is a good option to reduce the soot to zero levels. The reduction of soot to near zero levels introduces another advantage; the soot-NOx trade-off diminishes completely when utilizing exhaust gas recycling (EGR). The issue, however, is that the PN emission of nucleation mode particles is high when utilizing such fuels while ignition is hard to achieve with high octane number fuels in a CI engine.},
  author       = {Shamun, Sam and Garcia, Pablo and Svensson, Erik},
  isbn         = {978-981-13-3298-2},
  keyword      = {Biodiesel,Metanol,Etanol,Soot,Partiklar},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {181--181},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Alternative Fuels for Particulate Control in CI Engines},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3299-9_9},
  year         = {2018},
}