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Comparison of the resistance of industrial and laboratory strains of Saccharomyces and Zygosaccharomyces to lignocellulose-derived fermentation inhibitors

Martin, C and Jönsson, Leif LU (2003) In Enzyme and Microbial Technology 32(3-4). p.386-395
Abstract
Low-molecular weight aliphatic acids, furaldehydes and a broad range of different aromatic compounds are known to inhibit the fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates by yeasts. In this work, a cocktail of different lignocellulose-derived inhibitors was used to compare the inhibitor resistance of eleven different industrial and laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and two Zygosaccharomyces strains. The inhibitor cocktail was composed of two aliphatic acids, formic and acetic acid, two furaldehydes, furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and two aromatic compounds, cinnamic acid and coniferyl aldehyde. Fermentations were performed under oxygen-limited conditions and with different levels (100, 75, 50, 25 and 0%) of the... (More)
Low-molecular weight aliphatic acids, furaldehydes and a broad range of different aromatic compounds are known to inhibit the fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates by yeasts. In this work, a cocktail of different lignocellulose-derived inhibitors was used to compare the inhibitor resistance of eleven different industrial and laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and two Zygosaccharomyces strains. The inhibitor cocktail was composed of two aliphatic acids, formic and acetic acid, two furaldehydes, furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and two aromatic compounds, cinnamic acid and coniferyl aldehyde. Fermentations were performed under oxygen-limited conditions and with different levels (100, 75, 50, 25 and 0%) of the inhibitor cocktail present. The ethanol yield on initial glucose, the volumetric and specific ethanol productivity, the biomass yield and the glucose consumption rates were used as criteria for the performance of the strains. The results revealed major differences in inhibitor resistance between yeast strains within the same species. The ethanol yield of the S. cerevisiae strain that was least affected decreased only with 10% at an inhibitor cocktail concentration of 100%, while the decrease in ethanol yield for the most sensitive S. cerevisiae strain was more than 50% already at an inhibitor cocktail concentration of 25%. Ethanol formation was generally less affected than growth and ethanol yield less than ethanol productivity. The two most resistant strains were an S. cerevisiae strain isolated from a spent sulphite liquor plant and one of the laboratory S. cerevisiae strains. Additional fermentations with either HMF or coniferyl aldehyde revealed that the degree of resistance of different yeast strains was highly dependent on the inhibitor used. A mutant strain of S. cerevisiae displaying enhanced resistance against coniferyl aldehyde compared with the parental strains was identified. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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published
subject
keywords
fermentation inhibitors, Zyosaccharomyces, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lignocellulose, ethanol
in
Enzyme and Microbial Technology
volume
32
issue
3-4
pages
386 - 395
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000180995500006
  • scopus:0037416692
ISSN
0141-0229
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1c599123-159d-405c-a6ed-76299ac7a819 (old id 318267)
date added to LUP
2007-09-18 07:40:44
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:45:43
@article{1c599123-159d-405c-a6ed-76299ac7a819,
  abstract     = {Low-molecular weight aliphatic acids, furaldehydes and a broad range of different aromatic compounds are known to inhibit the fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates by yeasts. In this work, a cocktail of different lignocellulose-derived inhibitors was used to compare the inhibitor resistance of eleven different industrial and laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and two Zygosaccharomyces strains. The inhibitor cocktail was composed of two aliphatic acids, formic and acetic acid, two furaldehydes, furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and two aromatic compounds, cinnamic acid and coniferyl aldehyde. Fermentations were performed under oxygen-limited conditions and with different levels (100, 75, 50, 25 and 0%) of the inhibitor cocktail present. The ethanol yield on initial glucose, the volumetric and specific ethanol productivity, the biomass yield and the glucose consumption rates were used as criteria for the performance of the strains. The results revealed major differences in inhibitor resistance between yeast strains within the same species. The ethanol yield of the S. cerevisiae strain that was least affected decreased only with 10% at an inhibitor cocktail concentration of 100%, while the decrease in ethanol yield for the most sensitive S. cerevisiae strain was more than 50% already at an inhibitor cocktail concentration of 25%. Ethanol formation was generally less affected than growth and ethanol yield less than ethanol productivity. The two most resistant strains were an S. cerevisiae strain isolated from a spent sulphite liquor plant and one of the laboratory S. cerevisiae strains. Additional fermentations with either HMF or coniferyl aldehyde revealed that the degree of resistance of different yeast strains was highly dependent on the inhibitor used. A mutant strain of S. cerevisiae displaying enhanced resistance against coniferyl aldehyde compared with the parental strains was identified. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Martin, C and Jönsson, Leif},
  issn         = {0141-0229},
  keyword      = {fermentation inhibitors,Zyosaccharomyces,Saccharomyces cerevisiae,lignocellulose,ethanol},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {386--395},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Enzyme and Microbial Technology},
  title        = {Comparison of the resistance of industrial and laboratory strains of Saccharomyces and Zygosaccharomyces to lignocellulose-derived fermentation inhibitors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2003},
}