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A longitudinat study of maternal oxygen saturation during short-term submaximal exercise

Pirhonen, JP ; Lindqvist, Pelle LU and Marsal, Karel LU (2003) In Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging 23(1). p.37-41
Abstract
Purpose: Longitudinal prospective study before, during and after normal pregnancy of the effect of short-term submaximal exercise on maternal oxygen saturation. Methods: Fourteen healthy women were recruited to the study before a planned pregnancy, and were followed seven times during the pregnancy and for up to 6 month after delivery. A submaximal bicycle exercise test with a target heart rate of 85% of the predicted age-adjusted maximum was performed. Maternal oxygen saturation was continuously recorded using a pulse oximeter. Results: Maternal oxygen saturation at maximum work-load had increased significantly already at 8 weeks gestation compared with preconception levels, and remained at a significantly higher level until 29 weeks of... (More)
Purpose: Longitudinal prospective study before, during and after normal pregnancy of the effect of short-term submaximal exercise on maternal oxygen saturation. Methods: Fourteen healthy women were recruited to the study before a planned pregnancy, and were followed seven times during the pregnancy and for up to 6 month after delivery. A submaximal bicycle exercise test with a target heart rate of 85% of the predicted age-adjusted maximum was performed. Maternal oxygen saturation was continuously recorded using a pulse oximeter. Results: Maternal oxygen saturation at maximum work-load had increased significantly already at 8 weeks gestation compared with preconception levels, and remained at a significantly higher level until 29 weeks of gestation. Thereafter, the oxygen saturation continued to be higher even at 6 month postpartum. During the exercise test, the lowest saturation was found during the late recovery period, this remained unchanged before, during and after pregnancy. Conclusion: A pregnant woman responds to short-term exercise by increasing the oxygen saturation until 29 weeks. After that, the saturation level decreases but remains at a higher level even 6 month after delivery compared with preconception levels. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
work-load, pulse oximeter, pregnancy, prospective
in
Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
volume
23
issue
1
pages
37 - 41
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000180965200006
  • pmid:12558612
ISSN
1475-0961
DOI
10.1046/j.1475-097X.2003.00467.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Lund) (013018000), Pediatrics/Urology/Gynecology/Endocrinology (013240400)
id
3f72ed95-3e63-4683-8b64-af8ee8efc6bf (old id 318305)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:54:12
date last changed
2021-09-27 04:10:58
@article{3f72ed95-3e63-4683-8b64-af8ee8efc6bf,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Longitudinal prospective study before, during and after normal pregnancy of the effect of short-term submaximal exercise on maternal oxygen saturation. Methods: Fourteen healthy women were recruited to the study before a planned pregnancy, and were followed seven times during the pregnancy and for up to 6 month after delivery. A submaximal bicycle exercise test with a target heart rate of 85% of the predicted age-adjusted maximum was performed. Maternal oxygen saturation was continuously recorded using a pulse oximeter. Results: Maternal oxygen saturation at maximum work-load had increased significantly already at 8 weeks gestation compared with preconception levels, and remained at a significantly higher level until 29 weeks of gestation. Thereafter, the oxygen saturation continued to be higher even at 6 month postpartum. During the exercise test, the lowest saturation was found during the late recovery period, this remained unchanged before, during and after pregnancy. Conclusion: A pregnant woman responds to short-term exercise by increasing the oxygen saturation until 29 weeks. After that, the saturation level decreases but remains at a higher level even 6 month after delivery compared with preconception levels.},
  author       = {Pirhonen, JP and Lindqvist, Pelle and Marsal, Karel},
  issn         = {1475-0961},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {37--41},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging},
  title        = {A longitudinat study of maternal oxygen saturation during short-term submaximal exercise},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1475-097X.2003.00467.x},
  doi          = {10.1046/j.1475-097X.2003.00467.x},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2003},
}