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The freshwater cyanobacterium Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea produces compounds toxic to mice and to mammalian and fish cells

Teneva, I; Asparuhova, D; Dzhambazov, Balik LU ; Mladenov, R and Schirmer, K (2003) In Environmental Toxicology 18(1). p.9-20
Abstract
Despite a growing awareness of the presence of cyanobacterial toxins, knowledge about the ability of specific species to produce toxic compounds is still rather limited. It was the overall goal of the current work to investigate if probes derived from the freshwater species Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea (Kutz.) Gomont, a cyanobacterium frequently found in southern Europe and not previously investigated for the presence of bioactive compounds, were capable of eliciting in vivo and in vitro toxicity. The cyanobacterial extract revealed signs of neuro- as well as hepatotoxicity in mice, although these signs could not be explained by the well-known respective cyanobacterial neuro- and hepatotoxins saxitoxin and microcystin. Cytotoxicity was... (More)
Despite a growing awareness of the presence of cyanobacterial toxins, knowledge about the ability of specific species to produce toxic compounds is still rather limited. It was the overall goal of the current work to investigate if probes derived from the freshwater species Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea (Kutz.) Gomont, a cyanobacterium frequently found in southern Europe and not previously investigated for the presence of bioactive compounds, were capable of eliciting in vivo and in vitro toxicity. The cyanobacterial extract revealed signs of neuro- as well as hepatotoxicity in mice, although these signs could not be explained by the well-known respective cyanobacterial neuro- and hepatotoxins saxitoxin and microcystin. Cytotoxicity was elicited by the cyanobacterial extract in all mammalian cell lines tested. As well, the rainbow trout liver cell line, RTL-W1, was found to be susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of the extract, although the cytotoxicity was dependent on temperature. In contrast, the cyanobacterial growth medium elicited cytotoxicity independent of temperature, leading to morphological changes indicative of alterations to the cytoskeleton. Overall, the results suggest that Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea is an important cyanobacterium to be considered for its potential to cause health risks on environmental exposure of it to mammals and fish. Applying a combination of mammalian and piscine cell line bioassays is a unique approach that, combined with chemical analysis, could be used in the future to identify the structure and cellular mechanisms of the as-yet-unknown toxic Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea metabolites in particular and to screen cyanobacterial extracts for their toxicity in general. (C) 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
and mammalian cell cultures, fish, mouse bioassay, toxins, cyanobacteria, Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea, cytotoxicity
in
Environmental Toxicology
volume
18
issue
1
pages
9 - 20
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:12539139
  • wos:000180774100002
  • scopus:0344837820
ISSN
1520-4081
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d9d843ac-dd6d-4b13-90a2-03ae9889c979 (old id 319375)
date added to LUP
2007-09-23 10:35:06
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:57:52
@article{d9d843ac-dd6d-4b13-90a2-03ae9889c979,
  abstract     = {Despite a growing awareness of the presence of cyanobacterial toxins, knowledge about the ability of specific species to produce toxic compounds is still rather limited. It was the overall goal of the current work to investigate if probes derived from the freshwater species Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea (Kutz.) Gomont, a cyanobacterium frequently found in southern Europe and not previously investigated for the presence of bioactive compounds, were capable of eliciting in vivo and in vitro toxicity. The cyanobacterial extract revealed signs of neuro- as well as hepatotoxicity in mice, although these signs could not be explained by the well-known respective cyanobacterial neuro- and hepatotoxins saxitoxin and microcystin. Cytotoxicity was elicited by the cyanobacterial extract in all mammalian cell lines tested. As well, the rainbow trout liver cell line, RTL-W1, was found to be susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of the extract, although the cytotoxicity was dependent on temperature. In contrast, the cyanobacterial growth medium elicited cytotoxicity independent of temperature, leading to morphological changes indicative of alterations to the cytoskeleton. Overall, the results suggest that Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea is an important cyanobacterium to be considered for its potential to cause health risks on environmental exposure of it to mammals and fish. Applying a combination of mammalian and piscine cell line bioassays is a unique approach that, combined with chemical analysis, could be used in the future to identify the structure and cellular mechanisms of the as-yet-unknown toxic Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea metabolites in particular and to screen cyanobacterial extracts for their toxicity in general. (C) 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
  author       = {Teneva, I and Asparuhova, D and Dzhambazov, Balik and Mladenov, R and Schirmer, K},
  issn         = {1520-4081},
  keyword      = {and mammalian cell cultures,fish,mouse bioassay,toxins,cyanobacteria,Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea,cytotoxicity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {9--20},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Environmental Toxicology},
  title        = {The freshwater cyanobacterium Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea produces compounds toxic to mice and to mammalian and fish cells},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2003},
}