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Adult outcome of social function in adolescent-onset schizophrenia and affective psychosis

Jarbin, Håkan LU ; Ott, Yngve and Von Knorring, Anne-Liis (2003) In Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 42(2). p.176-183
Abstract
Objective: To examine and compare the adult outcome in a representative sample of hospitalized adolescent-onset psychoses including occupational and social aspects. Method: A total of 81 patients with a first episode of early-onset psychosis (before age 19 years) presenting to the University Hospital of Lund, Sweden, between 1982 and 1993 were followed up an average of 10.5 years (range 5.1-18.2) after admission. Initial diagnosis was assessed from records and consisted of DSM-IVschizophrenia (n = 32), schizoaffective disorder (n = 7), bipolar disorder (n = 25), and major depressive disorder with psychotic features (n = 17). All could be traced and assigned a major outcome group. Results: Early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder... (More)
Objective: To examine and compare the adult outcome in a representative sample of hospitalized adolescent-onset psychoses including occupational and social aspects. Method: A total of 81 patients with a first episode of early-onset psychosis (before age 19 years) presenting to the University Hospital of Lund, Sweden, between 1982 and 1993 were followed up an average of 10.5 years (range 5.1-18.2) after admission. Initial diagnosis was assessed from records and consisted of DSM-IVschizophrenia (n = 32), schizoaffective disorder (n = 7), bipolar disorder (n = 25), and major depressive disorder with psychotic features (n = 17). All could be traced and assigned a major outcome group. Results: Early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder suffered a chronic course with a poor outcome in 79% of the cases, while early-onset affective psychosis in 74% showed a good or intermediate outcome. The poor outcome (26%) in the affective group was connected to mental retardation in 7% and to progression to a schizoaffective disorder in 12%. A particularly severe outcome was seen for schizophrenia spectrum patients with a family history of nonaffective psychosis. Conclusions: Early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder showed a severe course while affective psychoses had a much more benign functional outcome. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
affective disorder, schizophrenia, adolescence, psychosis, outcome
in
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
volume
42
issue
2
pages
176 - 183
publisher
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000180539300011
  • pmid:12544177
  • scopus:0037313228
ISSN
0890-8567
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b7b71f2-519f-459e-841c-3b65c2e3f82c (old id 319516)
date added to LUP
2007-08-03 10:59:41
date last changed
2018-06-10 04:39:26
@article{8b7b71f2-519f-459e-841c-3b65c2e3f82c,
  abstract     = {Objective: To examine and compare the adult outcome in a representative sample of hospitalized adolescent-onset psychoses including occupational and social aspects. Method: A total of 81 patients with a first episode of early-onset psychosis (before age 19 years) presenting to the University Hospital of Lund, Sweden, between 1982 and 1993 were followed up an average of 10.5 years (range 5.1-18.2) after admission. Initial diagnosis was assessed from records and consisted of DSM-IVschizophrenia (n = 32), schizoaffective disorder (n = 7), bipolar disorder (n = 25), and major depressive disorder with psychotic features (n = 17). All could be traced and assigned a major outcome group. Results: Early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder suffered a chronic course with a poor outcome in 79% of the cases, while early-onset affective psychosis in 74% showed a good or intermediate outcome. The poor outcome (26%) in the affective group was connected to mental retardation in 7% and to progression to a schizoaffective disorder in 12%. A particularly severe outcome was seen for schizophrenia spectrum patients with a family history of nonaffective psychosis. Conclusions: Early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder showed a severe course while affective psychoses had a much more benign functional outcome.},
  author       = {Jarbin, Håkan and Ott, Yngve and Von Knorring, Anne-Liis},
  issn         = {0890-8567},
  keyword      = {affective disorder,schizophrenia,adolescence,psychosis,outcome},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {176--183},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams and Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry},
  title        = {Adult outcome of social function in adolescent-onset schizophrenia and affective psychosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2003},
}