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Climate change and invasion by intracontinental range-expanding exotic plants: the role of biotic interactions

Morrien, E.; Engelkes, T.; Macel, M.; Meisner, Annelein LU and Van der Putten, W. H. (2010) In Annals of Botany 105(6). p.843-848
Abstract
In this Botanical Briefing we describe how the interactions between plants and their biotic environment can change during range-expansion within a continent and how this may influence plant invasiveness. We address how mechanisms explaining intercontinental plant invasions by exotics (such as release from enemies) may also apply to climate-warming-induced range-expanding exotics within the same continent. We focus on above-ground and below-ground interactions of plants, enemies and symbionts, on plant defences, and on nutrient cycling. Range-expansion by plants may result in above-ground and below-ground enemy release. This enemy release can be due to the higher dispersal capacity of plants than of natural enemies. Moreover,... (More)
In this Botanical Briefing we describe how the interactions between plants and their biotic environment can change during range-expansion within a continent and how this may influence plant invasiveness. We address how mechanisms explaining intercontinental plant invasions by exotics (such as release from enemies) may also apply to climate-warming-induced range-expanding exotics within the same continent. We focus on above-ground and below-ground interactions of plants, enemies and symbionts, on plant defences, and on nutrient cycling. Range-expansion by plants may result in above-ground and below-ground enemy release. This enemy release can be due to the higher dispersal capacity of plants than of natural enemies. Moreover, lower-latitudinal plants can have higher defence levels than plants from temperate regions, making them better defended against herbivory. In a world that contains fewer enemies, exotic plants will experience less selection pressure to maintain high levels of defensive secondary metabolites. Range-expanders potentially affect ecosystem processes, such as nutrient cycling. These features are quite comparable with what is known of intercontinental invasive exotic plants. However, intracontinental range-expanding plants will have ongoing gene-flow between the newly established populations and the populations in the native range. This is a major difference from intercontinental invasive exotic plants, which become more severely disconnected from their source populations. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Climate change, range expansion, exotic plant, plant invasion, plant, defence, trophic interactions, enemy release, EICA, above-ground and, below-ground interactions, nutrient cycling, litter decomposition, enemy release hypothesis, nonnative plants, natural enemies, herbivores, evolution, responses, litter, decomposition, communities, mutualisms
in
Annals of Botany
volume
105
issue
6
pages
843 - 848
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:77953010344
ISSN
0305-7364
DOI
10.1093/aob/mcq064
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f2bd712c-a283-4fd0-a31c-ae6a50089bab (old id 3216594)
date added to LUP
2012-11-29 15:59:32
date last changed
2018-07-15 03:05:44
@article{f2bd712c-a283-4fd0-a31c-ae6a50089bab,
  abstract     = {In this Botanical Briefing we describe how the interactions between plants and their biotic environment can change during range-expansion within a continent and how this may influence plant invasiveness. We address how mechanisms explaining intercontinental plant invasions by exotics (such as release from enemies) may also apply to climate-warming-induced range-expanding exotics within the same continent. We focus on above-ground and below-ground interactions of plants, enemies and symbionts, on plant defences, and on nutrient cycling. Range-expansion by plants may result in above-ground and below-ground enemy release. This enemy release can be due to the higher dispersal capacity of plants than of natural enemies. Moreover, lower-latitudinal plants can have higher defence levels than plants from temperate regions, making them better defended against herbivory. In a world that contains fewer enemies, exotic plants will experience less selection pressure to maintain high levels of defensive secondary metabolites. Range-expanders potentially affect ecosystem processes, such as nutrient cycling. These features are quite comparable with what is known of intercontinental invasive exotic plants. However, intracontinental range-expanding plants will have ongoing gene-flow between the newly established populations and the populations in the native range. This is a major difference from intercontinental invasive exotic plants, which become more severely disconnected from their source populations.},
  author       = {Morrien, E. and Engelkes, T. and Macel, M. and Meisner, Annelein and Van der Putten, W. H.},
  issn         = {0305-7364},
  keyword      = {Climate change,range expansion,exotic plant,plant invasion,plant,defence,trophic interactions,enemy release,EICA,above-ground and,below-ground interactions,nutrient cycling,litter decomposition,enemy release hypothesis,nonnative plants,natural enemies,herbivores,evolution,responses,litter,decomposition,communities,mutualisms},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {843--848},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Annals of Botany},
  title        = {Climate change and invasion by intracontinental range-expanding exotic plants: the role of biotic interactions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcq064},
  volume       = {105},
  year         = {2010},
}