Advanced

Subjective Sleep Complaints Are Associated With Insulin Resistance in Individuals Without Diabetes The PPP-Botnia Study

Pyykkonen, Antti-Jussi; Isomaa, Bo; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Eriksson, Johan G.; Groop, Leif LU ; Tuomi, Tiinamaija and Raikkonen, Katri (2012) In Diabetes Care 35(11). p.2271-2278
Abstract
OBJECTIVE-Sleep disorders and subjective sleep complaints have been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The evidence with respect to insulin resistance (IR) and insulin secretion in individuals without type 2 diabetes has been scarce and elusive. We examined if subjective sleep complaints and their co-occurrence were associated with IR and insulin secretion in adult women and men without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Women (n = 442) and men (n = 354) 18-75 years of age without type 2 diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), with insulin and glucose measured at fasting and at 30 and 120 min. Complaints related to sleep apnea, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness were self-rated with the Basic Nordic Sleep... (More)
OBJECTIVE-Sleep disorders and subjective sleep complaints have been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The evidence with respect to insulin resistance (IR) and insulin secretion in individuals without type 2 diabetes has been scarce and elusive. We examined if subjective sleep complaints and their co-occurrence were associated with IR and insulin secretion in adult women and men without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Women (n = 442) and men (n = 354) 18-75 years of age without type 2 diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), with insulin and glucose measured at fasting and at 30 and 120 min. Complaints related to sleep apnea, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness were self-rated with the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire. RESULTS-In comparison with individuals with no or minor sleep complaints, those with more frequent complaints of sleep apnea, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness were more insulin resistant, as evidenced by higher fasting insulin concentrations and insulin and glucose responses to OGTT, and more frequently had high homeostasis model assessment of IR and low insulin sensitivity index values. The likelihood of being insulin resistant increased significantly and linearly according to the accumulation of co-occurring sleep complaints. These associations changed only a little when adjusted for mediating and confounding factors and for depressive symptoms. Sleep complaints were not associated with indices of deficiency in insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS-Subjective sleep complaints were associated with IR. The likelihood of being insulin resistant increased according to accumulation of co-occurring sleep complaints. Sleep complaints were not associated with deficiency in insulin secretion. Diabetes Care 35: 2271-2278, 2012 (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
35
issue
11
pages
2271 - 2278
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000311424100030
  • scopus:84868156097
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc12-0348
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
65d54ffb-c27e-4652-9a64-3442e7d6f8d3 (old id 3244204)
date added to LUP
2013-01-07 09:35:14
date last changed
2017-09-17 06:00:58
@article{65d54ffb-c27e-4652-9a64-3442e7d6f8d3,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE-Sleep disorders and subjective sleep complaints have been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The evidence with respect to insulin resistance (IR) and insulin secretion in individuals without type 2 diabetes has been scarce and elusive. We examined if subjective sleep complaints and their co-occurrence were associated with IR and insulin secretion in adult women and men without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Women (n = 442) and men (n = 354) 18-75 years of age without type 2 diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), with insulin and glucose measured at fasting and at 30 and 120 min. Complaints related to sleep apnea, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness were self-rated with the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire. RESULTS-In comparison with individuals with no or minor sleep complaints, those with more frequent complaints of sleep apnea, insomnia, and daytime sleepiness were more insulin resistant, as evidenced by higher fasting insulin concentrations and insulin and glucose responses to OGTT, and more frequently had high homeostasis model assessment of IR and low insulin sensitivity index values. The likelihood of being insulin resistant increased significantly and linearly according to the accumulation of co-occurring sleep complaints. These associations changed only a little when adjusted for mediating and confounding factors and for depressive symptoms. Sleep complaints were not associated with indices of deficiency in insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS-Subjective sleep complaints were associated with IR. The likelihood of being insulin resistant increased according to accumulation of co-occurring sleep complaints. Sleep complaints were not associated with deficiency in insulin secretion. Diabetes Care 35: 2271-2278, 2012},
  author       = {Pyykkonen, Antti-Jussi and Isomaa, Bo and Pesonen, Anu-Katriina and Eriksson, Johan G. and Groop, Leif and Tuomi, Tiinamaija and Raikkonen, Katri},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2271--2278},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Subjective Sleep Complaints Are Associated With Insulin Resistance in Individuals Without Diabetes The PPP-Botnia Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc12-0348},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2012},
}