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Succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from batch fermentation of mixed sugars

Almqvist, Henrik LU ; Pateraki, Chrysanthi; Alexandri, Maria; Koutinas, Apostolis and Lidén, Gunnar LU (2016) In Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology 43(8). p.1117-1130
Abstract
Succinic acid production from the monosaccharides xylose, arabinose, glucose, mannose and galactose was studied using the bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes. In Duran bottle cultures, containing 10 g/L of each of sugar, succinic acid was produced from all sugars except for galactose. The highest succinate yield, 0.56 g/g, was obtained with glucose, whereas the succinate yield was 0.42, 0.38 and 0.44 g/g for xylose, mannose and arabinose, respectively. The specific succinate productivity was 0.7 g/g h for glucose, but below 0.2 g/g h for the other sugars. Batch bioreactor fermentations were carried out using a sugar mixture of the five sugars giving a total concentration of 50 g/L, mimicking the distribution of sugars in spent sulfite... (More)
Succinic acid production from the monosaccharides xylose, arabinose, glucose, mannose and galactose was studied using the bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes. In Duran bottle cultures, containing 10 g/L of each of sugar, succinic acid was produced from all sugars except for galactose. The highest succinate yield, 0.56 g/g, was obtained with glucose, whereas the succinate yield was 0.42, 0.38 and 0.44 g/g for xylose, mannose and arabinose, respectively. The specific succinate productivity was 0.7 g/g h for glucose, but below 0.2 g/g h for the other sugars. Batch bioreactor fermentations were carried out using a sugar mixture of the five sugars giving a total concentration of 50 g/L, mimicking the distribution of sugars in spent sulfite liquor (SSL) from Eucalyptus which is rich in xylose. In this mixture, an almost complete conversion of all sugars (except galactose) was achieved resulting in a final succinate concentration of 21.8–26.8 g/L and a total yield of 0.59–0.68 g/g. There was evidence of co-consumption of glucose and xylose, whereas mannose was consumed after glucose. The main by-products were acetate 0.14–0.20 g/g and formate 0.08–0.13 g/g. NADH balance calculations suggested that NADH required for succinate production was not met solely from formate and acetate production, but other means of NADH production was necessary. Results from mixed sugar fermentations were verified using SSL as substrate resulting in a succinate yield of 0.60 g/g. In addition, it was found that CO2 sparging could replace carbonate supply in the form of MgCO3 without affecting the succinate yield. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Actinobacillus succinogenes,CO2 fixation,Fermentation,Mixed sugars,Succinate,actinobacillus,co 2 fixation,fermentation,mixed sugars,succinate,succinogenes
in
Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology
volume
43
issue
8
pages
14 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:84973164122
  • wos:000379625700007
ISSN
1367-5435
DOI
10.1007/s10295-016-1787-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
325840b8-e2bd-4aa4-af35-beeddda8784e
date added to LUP
2016-09-01 15:40:06
date last changed
2017-05-21 04:53:12
@article{325840b8-e2bd-4aa4-af35-beeddda8784e,
  abstract     = {Succinic acid production from the monosaccharides xylose, arabinose, glucose, mannose and galactose was studied using the bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes. In Duran bottle cultures, containing 10 g/L of each of sugar, succinic acid was produced from all sugars except for galactose. The highest succinate yield, 0.56 g/g, was obtained with glucose, whereas the succinate yield was 0.42, 0.38 and 0.44 g/g for xylose, mannose and arabinose, respectively. The specific succinate productivity was 0.7 g/g h for glucose, but below 0.2 g/g h for the other sugars. Batch bioreactor fermentations were carried out using a sugar mixture of the five sugars giving a total concentration of 50 g/L, mimicking the distribution of sugars in spent sulfite liquor (SSL) from Eucalyptus which is rich in xylose. In this mixture, an almost complete conversion of all sugars (except galactose) was achieved resulting in a final succinate concentration of 21.8–26.8 g/L and a total yield of 0.59–0.68 g/g. There was evidence of co-consumption of glucose and xylose, whereas mannose was consumed after glucose. The main by-products were acetate 0.14–0.20 g/g and formate 0.08–0.13 g/g. NADH balance calculations suggested that NADH required for succinate production was not met solely from formate and acetate production, but other means of NADH production was necessary. Results from mixed sugar fermentations were verified using SSL as substrate resulting in a succinate yield of 0.60 g/g. In addition, it was found that CO2 sparging could replace carbonate supply in the form of MgCO3 without affecting the succinate yield.},
  author       = {Almqvist, Henrik and Pateraki, Chrysanthi and Alexandri, Maria and Koutinas, Apostolis and Lidén, Gunnar},
  issn         = {1367-5435},
  keyword      = {Actinobacillus succinogenes,CO2 fixation,Fermentation,Mixed sugars,Succinate,actinobacillus,co 2 fixation,fermentation,mixed sugars,succinate,succinogenes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1117--1130},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology},
  title        = {Succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from batch fermentation of mixed sugars},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10295-016-1787-x},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2016},
}