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Married with Children : The Family Status of Female Agricultural Labourers at Two Southwestern Farms in the 1830s and 1840s

Burnette, Joyce LU (2007) In Agricultural History Review 55(1). p.75-94
Abstract
While female factory workers and agricultural servants were primarily young and single, female agricultural labourers were more likely to be middle-aged, married mothers. This paper examines the female labourers at two south-western farms and finds that middle-aged married women account for the majority of days worked. Widows and mothers of illegitimate children account for only a small fraction of the workforce. While evidence from the Bragg farm suggests that some mothers worked when their children were still infants, evidence from the Estcourt farm suggests that women reduced their labourforce participation when their children were young. Child care was available for mothers who worked outside the home, but it was expensive.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
women's work, agricultural laborers
in
Agricultural History Review
volume
55
issue
1
pages
20 pages
publisher
BAHS - British Agricultural History Society
ISSN
0002-1490
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
327861bf-d677-4f99-99d2-db9e31febd5e
alternative location
http://www.bahs.org.uk/AGHR/ARTICLES/55_101Dyer.pdf
date added to LUP
2017-09-21 15:32:42
date last changed
2017-09-22 12:35:13
@article{327861bf-d677-4f99-99d2-db9e31febd5e,
  abstract     = {While female factory workers and agricultural servants were primarily young and single, female agricultural labourers were more likely to be middle-aged, married mothers. This paper examines the female labourers at two south-western farms and finds that middle-aged married women account for the majority of days worked. Widows and mothers of illegitimate children account for only a small fraction of the workforce. While evidence from the Bragg farm suggests that some mothers worked when their children were still infants, evidence from the Estcourt farm suggests that women reduced their labourforce participation when their children were young. Child care was available for mothers who worked outside the home, but it was expensive.},
  author       = {Burnette, Joyce},
  issn         = {0002-1490},
  keyword      = {women's work,agricultural laborers},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {75--94},
  publisher    = {BAHS - British Agricultural History Society},
  series       = {Agricultural History Review},
  title        = {Married with Children : The Family Status of Female Agricultural Labourers at Two Southwestern Farms in the 1830s and 1840s},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2007},
}