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Synthesizing greenhouse gas fluxes across nine European peatlands and shrublands - responses to climatic and environmental changes

Carter, M. S.; Larsen, K. S.; Emmett, B.; Estiarte, M.; Field, C.; Leith, I. D.; Lund, Magnus LU ; Meijide, A.; Mills, R. T. E. and Niinemets, Ue., et al. (2012) In Biogeosciences 9(10). p.3739-3755
Abstract
In this study, we compare annual fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and soil respiratory carbon dioxide (CO2) measured at nine European peatlands (n = 4) and shrublands (n = 5). The sites range from northern Sweden to Spain, covering a span in mean annual air temperature from 0 to 16 degrees C, and in annual precipitation from 300 to 1300 mm yr(-1). The effects of climate change, including temperature increase and prolonged drought, were tested at five shrubland sites. At one peatland site, the long-term (> 30 yr) effect of drainage was assessed, while increased nitrogen deposition was investigated at three peatland sites. The shrublands were generally sinks for atmospheric CH4, whereas the peatlands were CH4 sources, with... (More)
In this study, we compare annual fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and soil respiratory carbon dioxide (CO2) measured at nine European peatlands (n = 4) and shrublands (n = 5). The sites range from northern Sweden to Spain, covering a span in mean annual air temperature from 0 to 16 degrees C, and in annual precipitation from 300 to 1300 mm yr(-1). The effects of climate change, including temperature increase and prolonged drought, were tested at five shrubland sites. At one peatland site, the long-term (> 30 yr) effect of drainage was assessed, while increased nitrogen deposition was investigated at three peatland sites. The shrublands were generally sinks for atmospheric CH4, whereas the peatlands were CH4 sources, with fluxes ranging from -519 to + 6890 mg CH4-Cm-2 yr(-1) across the studied ecosystems. At the peatland sites, annual CH4 emission increased with mean annual air temperature, while a negative relationship was found between net CH4 uptake and the soil carbon stock at the shrubland sites. Annual N2O fluxes were generally small ranging from -14 to 42 mg N2O-Nm(-2) yr(-1). Highest N2O emission occurred at the sites that had highest nitrate (NO3-) concentration in the soil water. Furthermore, experimentally increased NO3- deposition led to increased N2O efflux, whereas prolonged drought and long-term drainage reduced the N2O efflux. Soil CO2 emissions in control plots ranged from 310 to 732 g CO2-C m(-2) yr(-1). Drought and long-term drainage from -519 to + 6890 mg CH4-C m(-2) yr(-1) across the studied ecosystems. At the peatland sites, annual CH4 emission increased with mean annual air temperature, while a negative relationship was found between net CH4 uptake and the soil carbon stock at the shrubland sites. Annual N2O fluxes were generally small ranging from -14 to 42 mg N2O-N m(-2) yr(-1). Highest N2O emission occurred at the sites that had highest nitrate (NO3-) concentration in the soil water. Furthermore, experimentally increased NO3- deposition led to increased N2O efflux, whereas prolonged drought and long-term drainage reduced the N2O efflux. Soil CO2 emissions in control plots ranged from 310 to 732 g CO2-Cm-2 yr(-1). Drought and long-term drainage generally reduced the soil CO2 efflux, except at a hydric shrubland where drought tended to increase soil respiration. In terms of fractional importance of each greenhouse gas to the total numerical global warming response, the change in CO2 efflux dominated the response in all treatments (ranging 71-96%), except for NO3- addition where 89% was due to change in CH4 emissions. Thus, in European peatlands and shrublands the effect on global warming induced by the investigated anthropogenic disturbances will be dominated by variations in soil CO2 fluxes. (Less)
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Biogeosciences
volume
9
issue
10
pages
3739 - 3755
publisher
Copernicus Publications
external identifiers
  • wos:000310471800003
  • scopus:84868658859
ISSN
1726-4189
DOI
10.5194/bg-9-3739-2012
language
English
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yes
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963a1454-2986-4b0b-8934-50fdae0605ef (old id 3284088)
date added to LUP
2012-12-20 09:43:17
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:10:26
@article{963a1454-2986-4b0b-8934-50fdae0605ef,
  abstract     = {In this study, we compare annual fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and soil respiratory carbon dioxide (CO2) measured at nine European peatlands (n = 4) and shrublands (n = 5). The sites range from northern Sweden to Spain, covering a span in mean annual air temperature from 0 to 16 degrees C, and in annual precipitation from 300 to 1300 mm yr(-1). The effects of climate change, including temperature increase and prolonged drought, were tested at five shrubland sites. At one peatland site, the long-term (> 30 yr) effect of drainage was assessed, while increased nitrogen deposition was investigated at three peatland sites. The shrublands were generally sinks for atmospheric CH4, whereas the peatlands were CH4 sources, with fluxes ranging from -519 to + 6890 mg CH4-Cm-2 yr(-1) across the studied ecosystems. At the peatland sites, annual CH4 emission increased with mean annual air temperature, while a negative relationship was found between net CH4 uptake and the soil carbon stock at the shrubland sites. Annual N2O fluxes were generally small ranging from -14 to 42 mg N2O-Nm(-2) yr(-1). Highest N2O emission occurred at the sites that had highest nitrate (NO3-) concentration in the soil water. Furthermore, experimentally increased NO3- deposition led to increased N2O efflux, whereas prolonged drought and long-term drainage reduced the N2O efflux. Soil CO2 emissions in control plots ranged from 310 to 732 g CO2-C m(-2) yr(-1). Drought and long-term drainage from -519 to + 6890 mg CH4-C m(-2) yr(-1) across the studied ecosystems. At the peatland sites, annual CH4 emission increased with mean annual air temperature, while a negative relationship was found between net CH4 uptake and the soil carbon stock at the shrubland sites. Annual N2O fluxes were generally small ranging from -14 to 42 mg N2O-N m(-2) yr(-1). Highest N2O emission occurred at the sites that had highest nitrate (NO3-) concentration in the soil water. Furthermore, experimentally increased NO3- deposition led to increased N2O efflux, whereas prolonged drought and long-term drainage reduced the N2O efflux. Soil CO2 emissions in control plots ranged from 310 to 732 g CO2-Cm-2 yr(-1). Drought and long-term drainage generally reduced the soil CO2 efflux, except at a hydric shrubland where drought tended to increase soil respiration. In terms of fractional importance of each greenhouse gas to the total numerical global warming response, the change in CO2 efflux dominated the response in all treatments (ranging 71-96%), except for NO3- addition where 89% was due to change in CH4 emissions. Thus, in European peatlands and shrublands the effect on global warming induced by the investigated anthropogenic disturbances will be dominated by variations in soil CO2 fluxes.},
  author       = {Carter, M. S. and Larsen, K. S. and Emmett, B. and Estiarte, M. and Field, C. and Leith, I. D. and Lund, Magnus and Meijide, A. and Mills, R. T. E. and Niinemets, Ue. and Penuelas, J. and Portillo-Estrada, M. and Schmidt, I. K. and Selsted, M. B. and Sheppard, L. J. and Sowerby, A. and Tietema, A. and Beier, C.},
  issn         = {1726-4189},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {3739--3755},
  publisher    = {Copernicus Publications},
  series       = {Biogeosciences},
  title        = {Synthesizing greenhouse gas fluxes across nine European peatlands and shrublands - responses to climatic and environmental changes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/bg-9-3739-2012},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2012},
}