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Degradation of low density polyethylene during extrusion. I. Volatile compounds in smoke from extruded films

Andersson, T; Wesslén, Bengt LU and Sandstrom, J (2002) In Journal of Applied Polymer Science 86(7). p.1580-1586
Abstract
Many problems with odor and taste in food packaging can be traced to degradation of the packaging materials during processing. From this starting point, the degradation of polyethylene in a commercial extrusion coating process was studied by analyzing degradation products present in smoke sampled at the extruder die orifice. Two low-density polyethylenes, A and B, with similar melt flow indexes and densities and obtained from different producers, were investigated. A third polymer, C, consisting of recycled material B, was also investigated. More than 40 aliphatic aldehydes and ketones, together with 14 different carboxylic acids, were identified in the smoke. The highest concentration was found for acetaldehyde, regardless of polymer and... (More)
Many problems with odor and taste in food packaging can be traced to degradation of the packaging materials during processing. From this starting point, the degradation of polyethylene in a commercial extrusion coating process was studied by analyzing degradation products present in smoke sampled at the extruder die orifice. Two low-density polyethylenes, A and B, with similar melt flow indexes and densities and obtained from different producers, were investigated. A third polymer, C, consisting of recycled material B, was also investigated. More than 40 aliphatic aldehydes and ketones, together with 14 different carboxylic acids, were identified in the smoke. The highest concentration was found for acetaldehyde, regardless of polymer and processing conditions. Increasing the extrusion temperatures in the range 280-325 degreesC increased the amounts of the oxidized products in the smoke. The extruded film thickness, 12 and 25 mum, influenced the concentrations of degradation products, With the thicker film giving higher amounts of product. The recycled polymer C generally gave lower concentrations of degradation products compared with the virgin polymer B. Difference ill the product spectrum between the two virgin polymers may be related to differences in the manufacturing process, Many of the identified compounds have very characteristic taste and smell and are consequently of interest fron on odor and taste point of view in food packaging applications. (C) 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
degradation, polyethylene, extrusion, volatile compounds
in
Journal of Applied Polymer Science
volume
86
issue
7
pages
1580 - 1586
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000177921500010
  • scopus:0037078910
ISSN
1097-4628
DOI
10.1002/app.11030
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
080ca6ef-9cca-43fe-a188-4b3d444b61a2 (old id 328583)
date added to LUP
2007-08-07 09:47:33
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:34:15
@article{080ca6ef-9cca-43fe-a188-4b3d444b61a2,
  abstract     = {Many problems with odor and taste in food packaging can be traced to degradation of the packaging materials during processing. From this starting point, the degradation of polyethylene in a commercial extrusion coating process was studied by analyzing degradation products present in smoke sampled at the extruder die orifice. Two low-density polyethylenes, A and B, with similar melt flow indexes and densities and obtained from different producers, were investigated. A third polymer, C, consisting of recycled material B, was also investigated. More than 40 aliphatic aldehydes and ketones, together with 14 different carboxylic acids, were identified in the smoke. The highest concentration was found for acetaldehyde, regardless of polymer and processing conditions. Increasing the extrusion temperatures in the range 280-325 degreesC increased the amounts of the oxidized products in the smoke. The extruded film thickness, 12 and 25 mum, influenced the concentrations of degradation products, With the thicker film giving higher amounts of product. The recycled polymer C generally gave lower concentrations of degradation products compared with the virgin polymer B. Difference ill the product spectrum between the two virgin polymers may be related to differences in the manufacturing process, Many of the identified compounds have very characteristic taste and smell and are consequently of interest fron on odor and taste point of view in food packaging applications. (C) 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
  author       = {Andersson, T and Wesslén, Bengt and Sandstrom, J},
  issn         = {1097-4628},
  keyword      = {degradation,polyethylene,extrusion,volatile compounds},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1580--1586},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Applied Polymer Science},
  title        = {Degradation of low density polyethylene during extrusion. I. Volatile compounds in smoke from extruded films},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/app.11030},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2002},
}