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Possible impact of a primordial oil slick on atmospheric and chemical evolution

Nilson, Frans Peder LU (2002) In Origins of Life and Evolution of the Biosphere 32(3). p.247-253
Abstract
Low molecular weight liquid hydrocarbons from various sources, could have formed an oil layer covering the primeval ocean (present already 4.0-4.4 x 10(9) yr ago), preventing water from evaporating into the atmosphere. Water from other sources, precipitated by cold traps at higher altitude in the atmosphere, becomes trapped in the ocean. In a thereby more dry and presumably reducing atmosphere (before 3.9 x 10(9) yr ago) even more hydrocarbons, as well as reactive molecules will form. An oil layer can possibly act as a dry solvent for reactions, where the reactive molecules can produce monomers and condensing agents. Monomers and eventual polymers formed could become strongly concentrated at the oil-water interface, favouring molecular... (More)
Low molecular weight liquid hydrocarbons from various sources, could have formed an oil layer covering the primeval ocean (present already 4.0-4.4 x 10(9) yr ago), preventing water from evaporating into the atmosphere. Water from other sources, precipitated by cold traps at higher altitude in the atmosphere, becomes trapped in the ocean. In a thereby more dry and presumably reducing atmosphere (before 3.9 x 10(9) yr ago) even more hydrocarbons, as well as reactive molecules will form. An oil layer can possibly act as a dry solvent for reactions, where the reactive molecules can produce monomers and condensing agents. Monomers and eventual polymers formed could become strongly concentrated at the oil-water interface, favouring molecular interactions at high mobility and low dilution, without exposure to the destructive action of UV-light. Increased water leakiness of the oil layer due to accumulation of polar molecules within, would lead to photo-oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons, and subsequent emulsification at the oil-water interface, forming cellular structures. The atmosphere would then have lost its reducing character. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
reducing, oil layer, molecular interactions, dry solvent, hydrocarbons, atmosphere
in
Origins of Life and Evolution of the Biosphere
volume
32
issue
3
pages
247 - 253
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:12227429
  • wos:000177008700006
  • scopus:2242454877
ISSN
0169-6149
DOI
10.1023/A:1016577923630
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
72f583cc-d29a-475d-8aad-d19c7d1ba343 (old id 332605)
date added to LUP
2007-11-19 16:34:36
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:36:49
@article{72f583cc-d29a-475d-8aad-d19c7d1ba343,
  abstract     = {Low molecular weight liquid hydrocarbons from various sources, could have formed an oil layer covering the primeval ocean (present already 4.0-4.4 x 10(9) yr ago), preventing water from evaporating into the atmosphere. Water from other sources, precipitated by cold traps at higher altitude in the atmosphere, becomes trapped in the ocean. In a thereby more dry and presumably reducing atmosphere (before 3.9 x 10(9) yr ago) even more hydrocarbons, as well as reactive molecules will form. An oil layer can possibly act as a dry solvent for reactions, where the reactive molecules can produce monomers and condensing agents. Monomers and eventual polymers formed could become strongly concentrated at the oil-water interface, favouring molecular interactions at high mobility and low dilution, without exposure to the destructive action of UV-light. Increased water leakiness of the oil layer due to accumulation of polar molecules within, would lead to photo-oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons, and subsequent emulsification at the oil-water interface, forming cellular structures. The atmosphere would then have lost its reducing character.},
  author       = {Nilson, Frans Peder},
  issn         = {0169-6149},
  keyword      = {reducing,oil layer,molecular interactions,dry solvent,hydrocarbons,atmosphere},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {247--253},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Origins of Life and Evolution of the Biosphere},
  title        = {Possible impact of a primordial oil slick on atmospheric and chemical evolution},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1016577923630},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2002},
}