Advanced

Optimisation of a dosing strategy for an HC-SCR diesel exhaust after-treatment system

Westerberg, B; Kunkel, C and Odenbrand, Ingemar LU (2002) In Chemical Engineering Journal 87(2). p.207-217
Abstract
Several principal aspects and components of an advanced catalytic exhaust after-treatment system for NO, reduction on a heavy-duty diesel truck engine have been systematically examined and evaluated. The after-treatment system consists of de-NO, catalysts, injection of a reducing agent (diesel fuel), and computer programs to model the engine and catalysts in real time. These models are combined with a third program, a strategy, to control the injection of reducing agent during transient operation. Evaluation of the system was performed using the standard European transient cycle (ETC). The benefits and disadvantages of an oxidation catalyst upstream the reductant injection are clarified. Whereas an increased NO2/NO ratio is beneficial at... (More)
Several principal aspects and components of an advanced catalytic exhaust after-treatment system for NO, reduction on a heavy-duty diesel truck engine have been systematically examined and evaluated. The after-treatment system consists of de-NO, catalysts, injection of a reducing agent (diesel fuel), and computer programs to model the engine and catalysts in real time. These models are combined with a third program, a strategy, to control the injection of reducing agent during transient operation. Evaluation of the system was performed using the standard European transient cycle (ETC). The benefits and disadvantages of an oxidation catalyst upstream the reductant injection are clarified. Whereas an increased NO2/NO ratio is beneficial at larger reductant dosages, the effects of temperature levelling and delay are detrimental for system performance. The dynamic effect of introducing a strategy for distributing the reducing agent in time is elucidated. The strategy itself is presented and the process of its systematic optimisation is closely followed. Implications of the optimisation are that catalyst temperature is the most important variable in the strategy. Also, a considerable part of the reducing agent should be distributed at low and intermediate temperatures, for utilising an increased NO2/NO ratio. Furthermore, results suggest that a smooth, rather than instantaneous, adjustment of reductant dosage to driving conditions is necessary. Finally, a set-up with two injectors is examined for its potential in the application. It is shown to be of disadvantage for the ETC as a whole, but may not be so at lower exhaust gas flows. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
European transient cycle, after-treatment system, NOx reduction
in
Chemical Engineering Journal
volume
87
issue
2
pages
207 - 217
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000176725800009
  • scopus:0037188837
ISSN
1385-8947
DOI
10.1016/S1385-8947(01)00214-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dc60f04a-f40c-4478-8614-fb578c76d262 (old id 333828)
date added to LUP
2007-11-16 12:02:19
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:49:56
@article{dc60f04a-f40c-4478-8614-fb578c76d262,
  abstract     = {Several principal aspects and components of an advanced catalytic exhaust after-treatment system for NO, reduction on a heavy-duty diesel truck engine have been systematically examined and evaluated. The after-treatment system consists of de-NO, catalysts, injection of a reducing agent (diesel fuel), and computer programs to model the engine and catalysts in real time. These models are combined with a third program, a strategy, to control the injection of reducing agent during transient operation. Evaluation of the system was performed using the standard European transient cycle (ETC). The benefits and disadvantages of an oxidation catalyst upstream the reductant injection are clarified. Whereas an increased NO2/NO ratio is beneficial at larger reductant dosages, the effects of temperature levelling and delay are detrimental for system performance. The dynamic effect of introducing a strategy for distributing the reducing agent in time is elucidated. The strategy itself is presented and the process of its systematic optimisation is closely followed. Implications of the optimisation are that catalyst temperature is the most important variable in the strategy. Also, a considerable part of the reducing agent should be distributed at low and intermediate temperatures, for utilising an increased NO2/NO ratio. Furthermore, results suggest that a smooth, rather than instantaneous, adjustment of reductant dosage to driving conditions is necessary. Finally, a set-up with two injectors is examined for its potential in the application. It is shown to be of disadvantage for the ETC as a whole, but may not be so at lower exhaust gas flows.},
  author       = {Westerberg, B and Kunkel, C and Odenbrand, Ingemar},
  issn         = {1385-8947},
  keyword      = {European transient cycle,after-treatment system,NOx reduction},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {207--217},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Chemical Engineering Journal},
  title        = {Optimisation of a dosing strategy for an HC-SCR diesel exhaust after-treatment system},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1385-8947(01)00214-5},
  volume       = {87},
  year         = {2002},
}