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Effects of chronic leptin administration on nitric oxide production and immune responsiveness of greenfinches

Lõhmus, M.; Sild, Elin LU ; Hõrak, P. and Björklund, M. (2011) In Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A 158(4). p.560-565
Abstract
Leptin and nitric oxide (NO) are both important messengers in intra- and intercellular communication systems in vertebrates. Several studies have demonstrated an involvement of both substances in the immune response. Here we tested the effects of chronic leptin and anti-leptin treatments on the NO production and phytohaemagglutinin- (PHA) induced cutaneous inflammatory response in a wild passerine, the greenfinch (Carduelis chloris). Plasma leptin levels of individual birds were consistent in time but could be still temporarily increased by administration of recombinant chicken leptin. Increase of plasma leptin was also induced by administration of anti-leptin, which can be most likely explained by increased endogenous leptin production... (More)
Leptin and nitric oxide (NO) are both important messengers in intra- and intercellular communication systems in vertebrates. Several studies have demonstrated an involvement of both substances in the immune response. Here we tested the effects of chronic leptin and anti-leptin treatments on the NO production and phytohaemagglutinin- (PHA) induced cutaneous inflammatory response in a wild passerine, the greenfinch (Carduelis chloris). Plasma leptin levels of individual birds were consistent in time but could be still temporarily increased by administration of recombinant chicken leptin. Increase of plasma leptin was also induced by administration of anti-leptin, which can be most likely explained by increased endogenous leptin production due to disruption of signalling pathways. Contrary to previous findings in mammals, leptin administration reduced systemic NO production. Leptin increased cutaneous swelling response to PHA. This immune-enhancing effect was observable despite the similar plasma leptin levels of leptin-treated and control birds at the time of measurement of immune responses, i.e., 9. days after start of the treatments. This provides evidence for a delayed or long-term potentiation of the cells and cytokines involved. The effects of leptin administration on NO production and immune responsiveness were age-dependent, which indicates the complexity of underlying regulatory mechanisms. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Age differences, Body mass, Carduelis chloris, Cutaneous swelling response, Immunomodulation, Leptin, Nitric oxide, Passerine, Phytohaemagglutinin
in
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A
volume
158
issue
4
pages
560 - 565
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:79951774861
ISSN
1531-4332
DOI
10.1016/j.cbpa.2011.01.002
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
202b90f2-dd0e-477c-9120-ecdd30c616d2 (old id 3359196)
alternative location
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1095643311000031
date added to LUP
2013-01-16 12:16:09
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:44:02
@article{202b90f2-dd0e-477c-9120-ecdd30c616d2,
  abstract     = {Leptin and nitric oxide (NO) are both important messengers in intra- and intercellular communication systems in vertebrates. Several studies have demonstrated an involvement of both substances in the immune response. Here we tested the effects of chronic leptin and anti-leptin treatments on the NO production and phytohaemagglutinin- (PHA) induced cutaneous inflammatory response in a wild passerine, the greenfinch (Carduelis chloris). Plasma leptin levels of individual birds were consistent in time but could be still temporarily increased by administration of recombinant chicken leptin. Increase of plasma leptin was also induced by administration of anti-leptin, which can be most likely explained by increased endogenous leptin production due to disruption of signalling pathways. Contrary to previous findings in mammals, leptin administration reduced systemic NO production. Leptin increased cutaneous swelling response to PHA. This immune-enhancing effect was observable despite the similar plasma leptin levels of leptin-treated and control birds at the time of measurement of immune responses, i.e., 9. days after start of the treatments. This provides evidence for a delayed or long-term potentiation of the cells and cytokines involved. The effects of leptin administration on NO production and immune responsiveness were age-dependent, which indicates the complexity of underlying regulatory mechanisms. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.},
  author       = {Lõhmus, M. and Sild, Elin and Hõrak, P. and Björklund, M.},
  issn         = {1531-4332},
  keyword      = {Age differences,Body mass,Carduelis chloris,Cutaneous swelling response,Immunomodulation,Leptin,Nitric oxide,Passerine,Phytohaemagglutinin},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {560--565},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A},
  title        = {Effects of chronic leptin administration on nitric oxide production and immune responsiveness of greenfinches},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2011.01.002},
  volume       = {158},
  year         = {2011},
}