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Carotenoid intake does not affect immune-stimulated oxidative burst in greenfinches

Sild, Elin LU ; Sepp, T.; Männiste, M. and Hõrak, P. (2011) In Journal of Experimental Biology 214(20). p.3467-3473
Abstract
Carotenoid-based integument colouration is extremely widespread in the animal kingdom. It has been hypothesized that carotenoid colouration is used for communicating the health status of the bearers because carotenoids are efficient immunomodulators or antioxidants. However, the latter argument has been recently debated and the mechanisms by which carotenoids modulate immunity or oxidative balance are poorly known. We performed an experiment on wild-caught captive greenfinches, passerine birds with carotenoid-based plumage colouration, in order to test whether dietary carotenoid supplementation affects immune-stimulated oxidative burst of phagocytes in the whole blood and humoral immune response to a novel antigen, Brucella abortus (BA).... (More)
Carotenoid-based integument colouration is extremely widespread in the animal kingdom. It has been hypothesized that carotenoid colouration is used for communicating the health status of the bearers because carotenoids are efficient immunomodulators or antioxidants. However, the latter argument has been recently debated and the mechanisms by which carotenoids modulate immunity or oxidative balance are poorly known. We performed an experiment on wild-caught captive greenfinches, passerine birds with carotenoid-based plumage colouration, in order to test whether dietary carotenoid supplementation affects immune-stimulated oxidative burst of phagocytes in the whole blood and humoral immune response to a novel antigen, Brucella abortus (BA). Additionally, we tested whether immune stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affects blood carotenoid levels. We thus tested the effects of carotenoids on the oxidative burst of phagocytes under neutral conditions and during in vivo immune challenge. LPS injection depleted plasma carotenoids, indicating involvement of these phytochemicals in the immune response. However, we did not find any evidence that manipulation of carotenoid intake had modulated anti-BA antibody production, LPS-stimulated oxidative burst of phagocytes, or basal levels of circulating reactive oxygen species. This indicates that carotenoid intake does not affect endogenous production of reactive oxygen species by immune cells. This finding is consistent with the view that carotenoids are unlikely to provide a direct link between oxidative stress and colouration. However, it remains to be tested whether the oxidative burst of phagocytes induced in our experiment actually inflicts oxidative damage and whether carotenoids play a role in the attenuation of such potential damages. © 2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Brucella abortus, Carotenoid, Immune challenge, LPS, Passerine, Whole blood chemiluminescence response
in
Journal of Experimental Biology
volume
214
issue
20
pages
3467 - 3473
publisher
The Company of Biologists Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:80053907386
ISSN
1477-9145
DOI
10.1242/jeb.062182
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
878131dc-8c65-47ad-bc75-456d7752640d (old id 3359254)
date added to LUP
2013-01-15 16:20:40
date last changed
2017-07-23 03:06:48
@article{878131dc-8c65-47ad-bc75-456d7752640d,
  abstract     = {Carotenoid-based integument colouration is extremely widespread in the animal kingdom. It has been hypothesized that carotenoid colouration is used for communicating the health status of the bearers because carotenoids are efficient immunomodulators or antioxidants. However, the latter argument has been recently debated and the mechanisms by which carotenoids modulate immunity or oxidative balance are poorly known. We performed an experiment on wild-caught captive greenfinches, passerine birds with carotenoid-based plumage colouration, in order to test whether dietary carotenoid supplementation affects immune-stimulated oxidative burst of phagocytes in the whole blood and humoral immune response to a novel antigen, Brucella abortus (BA). Additionally, we tested whether immune stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affects blood carotenoid levels. We thus tested the effects of carotenoids on the oxidative burst of phagocytes under neutral conditions and during in vivo immune challenge. LPS injection depleted plasma carotenoids, indicating involvement of these phytochemicals in the immune response. However, we did not find any evidence that manipulation of carotenoid intake had modulated anti-BA antibody production, LPS-stimulated oxidative burst of phagocytes, or basal levels of circulating reactive oxygen species. This indicates that carotenoid intake does not affect endogenous production of reactive oxygen species by immune cells. This finding is consistent with the view that carotenoids are unlikely to provide a direct link between oxidative stress and colouration. However, it remains to be tested whether the oxidative burst of phagocytes induced in our experiment actually inflicts oxidative damage and whether carotenoids play a role in the attenuation of such potential damages. © 2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.},
  author       = {Sild, Elin and Sepp, T. and Männiste, M. and Hõrak, P.},
  issn         = {1477-9145},
  keyword      = {Brucella abortus,Carotenoid,Immune challenge,LPS,Passerine,Whole blood chemiluminescence response},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {20},
  pages        = {3467--3473},
  publisher    = {The Company of Biologists Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Experimental Biology},
  title        = {Carotenoid intake does not affect immune-stimulated oxidative burst in greenfinches},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.062182},
  volume       = {214},
  year         = {2011},
}