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Strategy to reduce the number of patients perceiving impaired visual function after cataract surgery

Lundstrom, M; Brege, KG; Florén, Ingrid LU ; Stenevi, U and Thorburn, W (2002) In Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery 28(6). p.971-976
Abstract
Purpose: To reduce the number of patients who perceive more difficulties performing daily life activities 6 months after cataract extraction than before surgery. Setting: Surgeons at 4 surgical units participating in the yearly outcome studies organized by the Swedish National Cataract Register. Methods: This study comprised surgical outcomes data and completed Catquest results before and after surgery collected from consecutive patients during a 1-month period yearly since 1995. The reasons for a no-benefit outcome from 1995 to 1997 were identified. During the 1-month study period in 1999, a strategy was launched to reduce postoperative anisometropia and disturbances from cataract in the fellow eye through better surgical planning.... (More)
Purpose: To reduce the number of patients who perceive more difficulties performing daily life activities 6 months after cataract extraction than before surgery. Setting: Surgeons at 4 surgical units participating in the yearly outcome studies organized by the Swedish National Cataract Register. Methods: This study comprised surgical outcomes data and completed Catquest results before and after surgery collected from consecutive patients during a 1-month period yearly since 1995. The reasons for a no-benefit outcome from 1995 to 1997 were identified. During the 1-month study period in 1999, a strategy was launched to reduce postoperative anisometropia and disturbances from cataract in the fellow eye through better surgical planning. Results: The percentage of patients with a no-benefit outcome who had anisometropia or cataract in the fellow eye as a probable reason for the outcome decreased from 27.3% and 13.0%, respectively, in the 1995 to 1997 study to 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively, in the 1999 study. Other reasons for a no-benefit outcome such as ocular co-morbidity or few preoperative problems increased in frequency, presumably as a result of a change in case mix. Conclusions: A strategy to reduce the number of patients perceiving more difficulties in performing daily life activities after cataract extraction than before surgery was tested, The number of patients with reasons for a poor outcome that the study focused on was reduced. Patients who gave reasons for a poor outcome other than anisometropia or cataract in the fellow eye increased in frequency, probably as a result of a change in case mix. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
volume
28
issue
6
pages
971 - 976
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000175914300022
  • pmid:12036638
  • scopus:0036268631
ISSN
1873-4502
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dd76e6b8-18c4-4477-8345-933ca1017a3d (old id 336243)
date added to LUP
2007-11-23 11:31:45
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:05:44
@article{dd76e6b8-18c4-4477-8345-933ca1017a3d,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To reduce the number of patients who perceive more difficulties performing daily life activities 6 months after cataract extraction than before surgery. Setting: Surgeons at 4 surgical units participating in the yearly outcome studies organized by the Swedish National Cataract Register. Methods: This study comprised surgical outcomes data and completed Catquest results before and after surgery collected from consecutive patients during a 1-month period yearly since 1995. The reasons for a no-benefit outcome from 1995 to 1997 were identified. During the 1-month study period in 1999, a strategy was launched to reduce postoperative anisometropia and disturbances from cataract in the fellow eye through better surgical planning. Results: The percentage of patients with a no-benefit outcome who had anisometropia or cataract in the fellow eye as a probable reason for the outcome decreased from 27.3% and 13.0%, respectively, in the 1995 to 1997 study to 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively, in the 1999 study. Other reasons for a no-benefit outcome such as ocular co-morbidity or few preoperative problems increased in frequency, presumably as a result of a change in case mix. Conclusions: A strategy to reduce the number of patients perceiving more difficulties in performing daily life activities after cataract extraction than before surgery was tested, The number of patients with reasons for a poor outcome that the study focused on was reduced. Patients who gave reasons for a poor outcome other than anisometropia or cataract in the fellow eye increased in frequency, probably as a result of a change in case mix.},
  author       = {Lundstrom, M and Brege, KG and Florén, Ingrid and Stenevi, U and Thorburn, W},
  issn         = {1873-4502},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {971--976},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery},
  title        = {Strategy to reduce the number of patients perceiving impaired visual function after cataract surgery},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2002},
}