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Segmenting dynamic human action via statistical structure

Baldwin, Dare; Andersson, Annika LU ; Saffran, Jenny and Meyer, Meredith (2008) In Cognition 106(3). p.1382-1407
Abstract
Human social, cognitive, and linguistic functioning depends on skills for rapidly processing action. Identifying distinct acts within the dynamic motion flow is one basic component of action processing; for example, skill at segmenting action is foundational to action categorization, verb learning, and comprehension of novel action sequences. Yet little is currently known about mechanisms that may subserve action segmentation. The present research documents that adults can register statistical regularities providing clues to action segmentation. This finding provides new evidence that structural knowledge gained by mechanisms such as statistical learning can play a role in action segmentation, and highlights a striking parallel between... (More)
Human social, cognitive, and linguistic functioning depends on skills for rapidly processing action. Identifying distinct acts within the dynamic motion flow is one basic component of action processing; for example, skill at segmenting action is foundational to action categorization, verb learning, and comprehension of novel action sequences. Yet little is currently known about mechanisms that may subserve action segmentation. The present research documents that adults can register statistical regularities providing clues to action segmentation. This finding provides new evidence that structural knowledge gained by mechanisms such as statistical learning can play a role in action segmentation, and highlights a striking parallel between processing of action and processing in other domains, such as language. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract). (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cognitive Processes, Adult Attitudes, Statistical Correlation, Group Dynamics, Knowledge Level, Human, Male, Female, Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
in
Cognition
volume
106
issue
3
pages
1382 - 1407
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:38649100337
ISSN
0010-0277
DOI
10.1016/j.cognition.2007.07.005
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
11a94b68-437d-450c-8937-afe6de0d9b45 (old id 3364171)
alternative location
http://library.lu.se/cgi-bin/ipchk/http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0010027707001837/1-s2.0-S0010027707001837-main.pdf?_tid=490aa28e-616d-11e2-ae94-00000aacb360&acdnat=1358513458_f5dd81b8b001855b64b03dafa0930f49
date added to LUP
2013-01-18 13:59:21
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:47:38
@article{11a94b68-437d-450c-8937-afe6de0d9b45,
  abstract     = {Human social, cognitive, and linguistic functioning depends on skills for rapidly processing action. Identifying distinct acts within the dynamic motion flow is one basic component of action processing; for example, skill at segmenting action is foundational to action categorization, verb learning, and comprehension of novel action sequences. Yet little is currently known about mechanisms that may subserve action segmentation. The present research documents that adults can register statistical regularities providing clues to action segmentation. This finding provides new evidence that structural knowledge gained by mechanisms such as statistical learning can play a role in action segmentation, and highlights a striking parallel between processing of action and processing in other domains, such as language. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).},
  author       = {Baldwin, Dare and Andersson, Annika and Saffran, Jenny and Meyer, Meredith},
  issn         = {0010-0277},
  keyword      = {Cognitive Processes,Adult Attitudes,Statistical Correlation,Group Dynamics,Knowledge Level,Human,Male,Female,Adulthood (18 yrs & older)},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1382--1407},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Cognition},
  title        = {Segmenting dynamic human action via statistical structure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2007.07.005},
  volume       = {106},
  year         = {2008},
}