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Phase-difference and spectroscopic imaging for monitoring of human brain temperature during cooling

Weis, Jan; Covaciu, Lucian; Rubertsson, Sten; Allers, Mats; Lunderquist, Anders LU ; Ortiz-Nieto, Francisco and Ahlstrom, Hakan (2012) In Magnetic Resonance Imaging 30(10). p.1505-1511
Abstract
Decrease of the human brain temperature was induced by intranasal cooling. The main purpose of this study was to compare the two magnetic resonance methods for monitoring brain temperature changes during cooling: phase-difference and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with high spatial resolution. Ten healthy volunteers were measured. Selective brain cooling was performed through nasal cavities using saline-cooled balloon catheters. MRSI was based on a radiofrequency spoiled gradient echo sequence. The spectral information was encoded by incrementing the echo time of the subsequent eight image records. Reconstructed voxel size was 1x1x5 mm(3). Relative brain temperature was computed from the positions of water spectral lines.... (More)
Decrease of the human brain temperature was induced by intranasal cooling. The main purpose of this study was to compare the two magnetic resonance methods for monitoring brain temperature changes during cooling: phase-difference and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with high spatial resolution. Ten healthy volunteers were measured. Selective brain cooling was performed through nasal cavities using saline-cooled balloon catheters. MRSI was based on a radiofrequency spoiled gradient echo sequence. The spectral information was encoded by incrementing the echo time of the subsequent eight image records. Reconstructed voxel size was 1x1x5 mm(3). Relative brain temperature was computed from the positions of water spectral lines. Phase maps were obtained from the first image record of the MRSI sequence. Mild hypothermia was achieved in 15-20 min. Mean brain temperature reduction varied in the interval <-3.0; -0.6>degrees C and <-2.7; -0.7>degrees C as measured by the MRSI and phase-difference methods, respectively. Very good correlation was found in all locations between the temperatures measured by both techniques except in the frontal lobe. Measurements in the transversal slices were more robust to the movement artifacts than those in the sagittal planes. Good agreement was found between the MRSI and phase-difference techniques. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
MR thermometry, Healthy volunteers, Brain temperature, Phase mapping, Spectroscopic imaging
in
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
volume
30
issue
10
pages
1505 - 1511
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000311261000018
  • scopus:84868659129
ISSN
1873-5894
DOI
10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bea7a809-e8b0-490f-a6cd-5f341236085d (old id 3379486)
date added to LUP
2013-02-01 07:03:01
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:13:47
@article{bea7a809-e8b0-490f-a6cd-5f341236085d,
  abstract     = {Decrease of the human brain temperature was induced by intranasal cooling. The main purpose of this study was to compare the two magnetic resonance methods for monitoring brain temperature changes during cooling: phase-difference and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with high spatial resolution. Ten healthy volunteers were measured. Selective brain cooling was performed through nasal cavities using saline-cooled balloon catheters. MRSI was based on a radiofrequency spoiled gradient echo sequence. The spectral information was encoded by incrementing the echo time of the subsequent eight image records. Reconstructed voxel size was 1x1x5 mm(3). Relative brain temperature was computed from the positions of water spectral lines. Phase maps were obtained from the first image record of the MRSI sequence. Mild hypothermia was achieved in 15-20 min. Mean brain temperature reduction varied in the interval &lt;-3.0; -0.6&gt;degrees C and &lt;-2.7; -0.7&gt;degrees C as measured by the MRSI and phase-difference methods, respectively. Very good correlation was found in all locations between the temperatures measured by both techniques except in the frontal lobe. Measurements in the transversal slices were more robust to the movement artifacts than those in the sagittal planes. Good agreement was found between the MRSI and phase-difference techniques. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Weis, Jan and Covaciu, Lucian and Rubertsson, Sten and Allers, Mats and Lunderquist, Anders and Ortiz-Nieto, Francisco and Ahlstrom, Hakan},
  issn         = {1873-5894},
  keyword      = {MR thermometry,Healthy volunteers,Brain temperature,Phase mapping,Spectroscopic imaging},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1505--1511},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
  title        = {Phase-difference and spectroscopic imaging for monitoring of human brain temperature during cooling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.004},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2012},
}