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Progress in integrated assessment and modelling

Parker, P; Letcher, R; Jakeman, A; Beck, MB; Harris, G; Argent, RM; Hare, M; Pahl-Wostl, C; Voinov, A and Janssen, M, et al. (2002) In Environmental Modelling & Software 17(3). p.209-217
Abstract
Environmental processes have been modelled for decades. However. the need for integrated assessment and modeling (IAM) has,town as the extent and severity of environmental problems in the 21st Century worsens. The scale of IAM is not restricted to the global level as in climate change models, but includes local and regional models of environmental problems. This paper discusses various definitions of IAM and identifies five different types of integration that Lire needed for the effective solution of environmental problems. The future is then depicted in the form of two brief scenarios: one optimistic and one pessimistic. The current state of IAM is then briefly reviewed. The issues of complexity and validation in IAM are recognised as... (More)
Environmental processes have been modelled for decades. However. the need for integrated assessment and modeling (IAM) has,town as the extent and severity of environmental problems in the 21st Century worsens. The scale of IAM is not restricted to the global level as in climate change models, but includes local and regional models of environmental problems. This paper discusses various definitions of IAM and identifies five different types of integration that Lire needed for the effective solution of environmental problems. The future is then depicted in the form of two brief scenarios: one optimistic and one pessimistic. The current state of IAM is then briefly reviewed. The issues of complexity and validation in IAM are recognised as more complex than in traditional disciplinary approaches. Communication is identified as a central issue both internally among team members and externally with decision-makers. stakeholders and other scientists. Finally it is concluded that the process of integrated assessment and modelling is considered as important as the product for any particular project. By learning to work together and recognise the contribution of all team members and participants, it is believed that we will have a strong scientific and social basis to address the environmental problems of the 21st Century. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
integrated assessment and modelling integration, communication, multi-disciplinary teams
in
Environmental Modelling & Software
volume
17
issue
3
pages
209 - 217
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000175532200002
  • scopus:18344388806
ISSN
1364-8152
DOI
10.1016/S1364-8152(01)00059-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2bbf686d-d75b-444b-bf7b-1fc8d26f68d8 (old id 338310)
date added to LUP
2007-11-02 15:31:03
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:45:41
@article{2bbf686d-d75b-444b-bf7b-1fc8d26f68d8,
  abstract     = {Environmental processes have been modelled for decades. However. the need for integrated assessment and modeling (IAM) has,town as the extent and severity of environmental problems in the 21st Century worsens. The scale of IAM is not restricted to the global level as in climate change models, but includes local and regional models of environmental problems. This paper discusses various definitions of IAM and identifies five different types of integration that Lire needed for the effective solution of environmental problems. The future is then depicted in the form of two brief scenarios: one optimistic and one pessimistic. The current state of IAM is then briefly reviewed. The issues of complexity and validation in IAM are recognised as more complex than in traditional disciplinary approaches. Communication is identified as a central issue both internally among team members and externally with decision-makers. stakeholders and other scientists. Finally it is concluded that the process of integrated assessment and modelling is considered as important as the product for any particular project. By learning to work together and recognise the contribution of all team members and participants, it is believed that we will have a strong scientific and social basis to address the environmental problems of the 21st Century.},
  author       = {Parker, P and Letcher, R and Jakeman, A and Beck, MB and Harris, G and Argent, RM and Hare, M and Pahl-Wostl, C and Voinov, A and Janssen, M and Sullivan, P and Scoccimarro, M and Friend, A and Sonnenshein, M and BAker, D and Matejicek, L and Odulaja, D and Deadman, P and Lim, K and Larocque, G and Tarikhi, P and Fletcher, C and Put, A and Maxwell, T and Charles, A and Breeze, H and Nakatani, N and Mudgal, S and Naito, W and Osidele, O and Eriksson, I and Kautsky, U and Kautsky, E and Naeslund, B and Kumblad, L and Park, R and Maltagliati, S and Girardin, P and Rizzoli, A and Mauriello, D and Hoch, R and Pelletier, D and Reilly, J and Olafsdottir, Rannveig and Bin, S},
  issn         = {1364-8152},
  keyword      = {integrated assessment and modelling integration,communication,multi-disciplinary teams},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {209--217},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Environmental Modelling & Software},
  title        = {Progress in integrated assessment and modelling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1364-8152(01)00059-7},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2002},
}