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The effect of achieving a systolic blood pressure of 140 mmHg. A prospective study of ambulatory measurements in type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy

Torffvit, Ole LU (2012) In Journal of Diabetes and its Complications 26(6). p.540-545
Abstract
Objectives: What is the prognostic significance of achieving a systolic blood pressure of <140 mmHg? Setting: Diabetic renal policlinic, university hospital of Lund, Sweden. Subjects: 118 type 2 diabetic patients with micro-macroalbuminuria were followed for four years (range 1-8 years). Method and main outcome measures: The prognostic significance of office, day- and nighttime measurements of blood pressure (BP) for development of cardiovascular complications was studied. Results: Forty-two percent (n=49) developed one or more of the following cardiovascular endpoints: 23% (n = 27) death, 9% (n = 10) stroke, 9% (n = 11) myocardial infarction, 9% (n = 11) heart failure, 31% (n = 36) uremia and 17% (n = 20) need for dialysis. Reaching... (More)
Objectives: What is the prognostic significance of achieving a systolic blood pressure of <140 mmHg? Setting: Diabetic renal policlinic, university hospital of Lund, Sweden. Subjects: 118 type 2 diabetic patients with micro-macroalbuminuria were followed for four years (range 1-8 years). Method and main outcome measures: The prognostic significance of office, day- and nighttime measurements of blood pressure (BP) for development of cardiovascular complications was studied. Results: Forty-two percent (n=49) developed one or more of the following cardiovascular endpoints: 23% (n = 27) death, 9% (n = 10) stroke, 9% (n = 11) myocardial infarction, 9% (n = 11) heart failure, 31% (n = 36) uremia and 17% (n = 20) need for dialysis. Reaching the goal for day- and nighttime systolic BP (SBP) at baseline of <140 mmHg was associated with lower risk for developing uremia. Reaching the goal for nighttime SBP was associated with a decreased risk for developing myocardial infarction and need for dialysis treatment. None of these associations was found for office SBP. Patients not achieving the goal for nighttime systolic blood pressure of <140 mmHg had a 12.9 times higher risk of developing myocardial infarction and 3.9 times increased risk of uremia and 2.7 times increased risk for death than patients achieving the goal. Conclusion: Nighttime blood pressure had better prognostic significance for developing cardiovascular and renal complications than office and daytime blood pressure. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Ambulatory blood pressure, Diabetic nephropathy, Hypertension, Macroalbuminuria, Microalbuminuria, Uremia
in
Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
volume
26
issue
6
pages
540 - 545
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000311267700014
  • scopus:84868649423
ISSN
1873-460X
DOI
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2012.05.020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d34e7e7-b93c-4249-b444-9d1e46c64f84 (old id 3388377)
date added to LUP
2013-02-01 07:03:55
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:24:18
@article{4d34e7e7-b93c-4249-b444-9d1e46c64f84,
  abstract     = {Objectives: What is the prognostic significance of achieving a systolic blood pressure of &lt;140 mmHg? Setting: Diabetic renal policlinic, university hospital of Lund, Sweden. Subjects: 118 type 2 diabetic patients with micro-macroalbuminuria were followed for four years (range 1-8 years). Method and main outcome measures: The prognostic significance of office, day- and nighttime measurements of blood pressure (BP) for development of cardiovascular complications was studied. Results: Forty-two percent (n=49) developed one or more of the following cardiovascular endpoints: 23% (n = 27) death, 9% (n = 10) stroke, 9% (n = 11) myocardial infarction, 9% (n = 11) heart failure, 31% (n = 36) uremia and 17% (n = 20) need for dialysis. Reaching the goal for day- and nighttime systolic BP (SBP) at baseline of &lt;140 mmHg was associated with lower risk for developing uremia. Reaching the goal for nighttime SBP was associated with a decreased risk for developing myocardial infarction and need for dialysis treatment. None of these associations was found for office SBP. Patients not achieving the goal for nighttime systolic blood pressure of &lt;140 mmHg had a 12.9 times higher risk of developing myocardial infarction and 3.9 times increased risk of uremia and 2.7 times increased risk for death than patients achieving the goal. Conclusion: Nighttime blood pressure had better prognostic significance for developing cardiovascular and renal complications than office and daytime blood pressure. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Torffvit, Ole},
  issn         = {1873-460X},
  keyword      = {Ambulatory blood pressure,Diabetic nephropathy,Hypertension,Macroalbuminuria,Microalbuminuria,Uremia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {540--545},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Diabetes and its Complications},
  title        = {The effect of achieving a systolic blood pressure of 140 mmHg. A prospective study of ambulatory measurements in type 2 diabetic patients with nephropathy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2012.05.020},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2012},
}