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Do We Need a Distinction between Arguments and Adjuncts? Evidence from Psycholinguistic Studies of Comprehension

Tutunjian, Damon LU and Boland, Julie E. (2008) In Language and Linguistics Compass 2(4). p.631-646
Abstract
Within both psycholinguistic theories of parsing and formal theories of syntax, a

distinction between arguments and adjuncts is central to some theories, while

minimized or denied by others. Even for theories that deem the argument/

adjunct distinction important, the exact nature of the distinction has been difficult

to characterize. In this article, we review the psycholinguistic evidence for an

argument/adjunct distinction, discuss how argument status can best be defined in

the light of such evidence, and consider the implications for how grammatical

knowledge is represented and accessed in the human mind.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Psycholinguistics, sentence processing, arguments and adjuncts, eyetracking.
in
Language and Linguistics Compass
volume
2
issue
4
pages
631 - 646
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:65349185695
ISSN
1749-818X
DOI
10.1111/j.1749-818X.2008.00071.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
e15adb08-f80b-458c-8d68-e9637bc9d367 (old id 3404908)
date added to LUP
2013-01-23 13:10:08
date last changed
2017-01-15 03:46:41
@article{e15adb08-f80b-458c-8d68-e9637bc9d367,
  abstract     = {Within both psycholinguistic theories of parsing and formal theories of syntax, a<br/><br>
distinction between arguments and adjuncts is central to some theories, while<br/><br>
minimized or denied by others. Even for theories that deem the argument/<br/><br>
adjunct distinction important, the exact nature of the distinction has been difficult<br/><br>
to characterize. In this article, we review the psycholinguistic evidence for an<br/><br>
argument/adjunct distinction, discuss how argument status can best be defined in<br/><br>
the light of such evidence, and consider the implications for how grammatical<br/><br>
knowledge is represented and accessed in the human mind.},
  author       = {Tutunjian, Damon and Boland, Julie E.},
  issn         = {1749-818X},
  keyword      = {Psycholinguistics,sentence processing,arguments and adjuncts,eyetracking.},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {631--646},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Language and Linguistics Compass},
  title        = {Do We Need a Distinction between Arguments and Adjuncts? Evidence from Psycholinguistic Studies of Comprehension},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-818X.2008.00071.x},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2008},
}