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Associations between markers of respiratory morbidity in European children

Timonen, KL; Schwartz, J; Nielsen, Jörn LU and Brunekreef, B (2002) In European Respiratory Journal1988-01-01+01:00 19(3). p.479-486
Abstract
School-aged children often experience acute respiratory symptoms. In a multicentre European study, the association between chronic respiratory symptoms (reported in a questionnaire), skin-prick test results, and lung function, and the occurrence of acute respiratory morbidity, was examined among children aged 6-12 yrs with chronic respiratory symptoms. Children with chronic respiratory symptoms, living in 10 European countries, were selected from a parent-completed questionnaire (n=4,307). Atopy was measured with skin-prick tests, and lung function with spirometry. A total of 1,854 (86%, of those in the initial cohort) children kept a successful daily diary regarding their respiratory symptoms for 2-3 months. In multivariate logistic... (More)
School-aged children often experience acute respiratory symptoms. In a multicentre European study, the association between chronic respiratory symptoms (reported in a questionnaire), skin-prick test results, and lung function, and the occurrence of acute respiratory morbidity, was examined among children aged 6-12 yrs with chronic respiratory symptoms. Children with chronic respiratory symptoms, living in 10 European countries, were selected from a parent-completed questionnaire (n=4,307). Atopy was measured with skin-prick tests, and lung function with spirometry. A total of 1,854 (86%, of those in the initial cohort) children kept a successful daily diary regarding their respiratory symptoms for 2-3 months. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, children with asthmatic symptoms, particularly those with doctor-diagnosed asthma, had a greater risk of occurrence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR): 6.12; 95%, confidence interval (CI): 4.99-8.35) than children with a dry nocturnal cough as their only symptom. Atopy, particularly a positive reaction to indoor allergens, was significantly associated with occurrence of lower respiratory symptoms. For atopy the OR was 1.62 (95%, CI: 1.34-1.96). A reduced level of maximal mid-expiratory How was associated with an increased risk of lower respiratory symptoms, cough and phlegm. The associations were similar in Scandinavia, Central Eastern, Western and Southern Europe. To conclude, asthmatic symptoms reported in a questionnaire, atopic status and a reduced level of maximal mid-expiratory flow were associated with the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms, especially those of lower respiratory symptoms. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
children, lung function, atopy, respiratory symptom
in
European Respiratory Journal1988-01-01+01:00
volume
19
issue
3
pages
479 - 486
publisher
Eur Respiratory Soc
external identifiers
  • wos:000174521700016
  • pmid:11936526
  • scopus:0036198768
ISSN
1399-3003
DOI
10.1183/09031936.02.00087802
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3a8f0b4b-8af5-4c0a-962b-273d541991c8 (old id 341903)
date added to LUP
2007-11-16 10:51:02
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:45:55
@article{3a8f0b4b-8af5-4c0a-962b-273d541991c8,
  abstract     = {School-aged children often experience acute respiratory symptoms. In a multicentre European study, the association between chronic respiratory symptoms (reported in a questionnaire), skin-prick test results, and lung function, and the occurrence of acute respiratory morbidity, was examined among children aged 6-12 yrs with chronic respiratory symptoms. Children with chronic respiratory symptoms, living in 10 European countries, were selected from a parent-completed questionnaire (n=4,307). Atopy was measured with skin-prick tests, and lung function with spirometry. A total of 1,854 (86%, of those in the initial cohort) children kept a successful daily diary regarding their respiratory symptoms for 2-3 months. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, children with asthmatic symptoms, particularly those with doctor-diagnosed asthma, had a greater risk of occurrence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR): 6.12; 95%, confidence interval (CI): 4.99-8.35) than children with a dry nocturnal cough as their only symptom. Atopy, particularly a positive reaction to indoor allergens, was significantly associated with occurrence of lower respiratory symptoms. For atopy the OR was 1.62 (95%, CI: 1.34-1.96). A reduced level of maximal mid-expiratory How was associated with an increased risk of lower respiratory symptoms, cough and phlegm. The associations were similar in Scandinavia, Central Eastern, Western and Southern Europe. To conclude, asthmatic symptoms reported in a questionnaire, atopic status and a reduced level of maximal mid-expiratory flow were associated with the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms, especially those of lower respiratory symptoms.},
  author       = {Timonen, KL and Schwartz, J and Nielsen, Jörn and Brunekreef, B},
  issn         = {1399-3003},
  keyword      = {children,lung function,atopy,respiratory symptom},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {479--486},
  publisher    = {Eur Respiratory Soc},
  series       = {European Respiratory Journal1988-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Associations between markers of respiratory morbidity in European children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.02.00087802},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2002},
}