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The importance of smoking and medical history for development of small bowel carcinoid tumor: a European population-based case-control study

Kaerlev, L; Teglbjaerg, PS; Sabroe, S; Kolstad, HA; Ahrens, W; Eriksson, Mikael LU ; Guenel, P; Gorini, G; Hardell, L and Cyr, D, et al. (2002) In Cancer Causes and Control 13(1). p.27-34
Abstract
Objective: Little is known about the etiology of small bowel carcinoid tumor (SBC), but a few studies have pointed to certain medical and lifestyle factors as potential risk factors. This study aims to evaluate these findings and to identify new associations. Methods: A population-based European multicenter case-control study was conducted from 1995 through 1997. Incident histologically verified 35-69 year-old SBC cases (n = 99) and 3335 controls were recruited; 84 cases and 2070 controls were interviewed. Results: Ever being a smoker was associated with SBC (odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.2) and increased risk estimates were seen for all smoking categories. SBC was associated with previous gallstone disease and... (More)
Objective: Little is known about the etiology of small bowel carcinoid tumor (SBC), but a few studies have pointed to certain medical and lifestyle factors as potential risk factors. This study aims to evaluate these findings and to identify new associations. Methods: A population-based European multicenter case-control study was conducted from 1995 through 1997. Incident histologically verified 35-69 year-old SBC cases (n = 99) and 3335 controls were recruited; 84 cases and 2070 controls were interviewed. Results: Ever being a smoker was associated with SBC (odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.2) and increased risk estimates were seen for all smoking categories. SBC was associated with previous gallstone disease and ovariectomy, but only when these conditions occurred within two years prior to the SBC diagnosis. No association was seen for a history of cholecystitis, liver cirrhosis, ulcerative disease, or Crohn's disease. Intake of alcoholic beverages - as well as medical treatments with radioactive substances, hormones, or corticosteroid tablets - were not associated with SBC. Conclusions: This study indicates that tobacco smoking is a risk factor for SBC. The associations with gallstone and ovarian diseases may be due to enhanced medical surveillance during the early phase of the cancer disease. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
tobacco, small intestine, gallstone, epidemiology, alcohol, carcinoid tumor
in
Cancer Causes and Control
volume
13
issue
1
pages
27 - 34
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000173582800004
  • pmid:11899115
  • scopus:0036173554
ISSN
1573-7225
DOI
10.1023/A:1013922226614
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
27052585-c521-4d05-9703-7812b4844d7f (old id 344229)
date added to LUP
2007-10-31 08:45:21
date last changed
2017-06-25 03:29:50
@article{27052585-c521-4d05-9703-7812b4844d7f,
  abstract     = {Objective: Little is known about the etiology of small bowel carcinoid tumor (SBC), but a few studies have pointed to certain medical and lifestyle factors as potential risk factors. This study aims to evaluate these findings and to identify new associations. Methods: A population-based European multicenter case-control study was conducted from 1995 through 1997. Incident histologically verified 35-69 year-old SBC cases (n = 99) and 3335 controls were recruited; 84 cases and 2070 controls were interviewed. Results: Ever being a smoker was associated with SBC (odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.2) and increased risk estimates were seen for all smoking categories. SBC was associated with previous gallstone disease and ovariectomy, but only when these conditions occurred within two years prior to the SBC diagnosis. No association was seen for a history of cholecystitis, liver cirrhosis, ulcerative disease, or Crohn's disease. Intake of alcoholic beverages - as well as medical treatments with radioactive substances, hormones, or corticosteroid tablets - were not associated with SBC. Conclusions: This study indicates that tobacco smoking is a risk factor for SBC. The associations with gallstone and ovarian diseases may be due to enhanced medical surveillance during the early phase of the cancer disease.},
  author       = {Kaerlev, L and Teglbjaerg, PS and Sabroe, S and Kolstad, HA and Ahrens, W and Eriksson, Mikael and Guenel, P and Gorini, G and Hardell, L and Cyr, D and Zambon, P and Stang, A and Olsen, J},
  issn         = {1573-7225},
  keyword      = {tobacco,small intestine,gallstone,epidemiology,alcohol,carcinoid tumor},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {27--34},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cancer Causes and Control},
  title        = {The importance of smoking and medical history for development of small bowel carcinoid tumor: a European population-based case-control study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1013922226614},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2002},
}