Advanced

The gut microbiota : A predisposing factor in obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis

Fåk, Frida LU (2016) In The Human Microbiota and Chronic Disease: Dysbiosis as a Cause of Human Pathology p.351-359
Abstract

The cluster of pathologies comprising the metabolic syndrome (MetS) includes increased waist circumference, hyperglycemia, elevated blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. With time, these conditions present a major risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) experiments performed in mice have given an intriguing foundation for a microbial-based therapy of obesity in humans. In the years 2004 - 2009, Gordon and colleagues presented ground-breaking studies on the role of the gut microbiota in host energy metabolism and proposed the hypothesis that obesity alters the composition of bacteria in the gut. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) is a component of Gramnegative bacteria cell walls and is... (More)

The cluster of pathologies comprising the metabolic syndrome (MetS) includes increased waist circumference, hyperglycemia, elevated blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. With time, these conditions present a major risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) experiments performed in mice have given an intriguing foundation for a microbial-based therapy of obesity in humans. In the years 2004 - 2009, Gordon and colleagues presented ground-breaking studies on the role of the gut microbiota in host energy metabolism and proposed the hypothesis that obesity alters the composition of bacteria in the gut. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) is a component of Gramnegative bacteria cell walls and is pro-inflammatory through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on antigen-presenting cells located both in the gut and in other tissues in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) presents in two major forms: type I and type II, characterized by vastly different molecular events leading up to malfunction of glucose homeostasis.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Atherosclerosis, Diabetes mellitus, Fecal microbiota transplant, Glucose homeostasis, Gut microbiota, Lipopolysaccharides, Metabolic syndrome, Microbial-based therapy, Obesity, Toll-like receptor 4
in
The Human Microbiota and Chronic Disease: Dysbiosis as a Cause of Human Pathology
pages
9 pages
publisher
Interscience Wiley
external identifiers
  • scopus:85018685700
ISBN
9781118982907
9781118982877
DOI
10.1002/9781118982907.ch23
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34b4efb3-4503-4d0e-9ea9-4beaecde9bc1
date added to LUP
2017-05-24 14:30:28
date last changed
2017-05-24 14:30:28
@inbook{34b4efb3-4503-4d0e-9ea9-4beaecde9bc1,
  abstract     = {<p>The cluster of pathologies comprising the metabolic syndrome (MetS) includes increased waist circumference, hyperglycemia, elevated blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. With time, these conditions present a major risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) experiments performed in mice have given an intriguing foundation for a microbial-based therapy of obesity in humans. In the years 2004 - 2009, Gordon and colleagues presented ground-breaking studies on the role of the gut microbiota in host energy metabolism and proposed the hypothesis that obesity alters the composition of bacteria in the gut. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) is a component of Gramnegative bacteria cell walls and is pro-inflammatory through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on antigen-presenting cells located both in the gut and in other tissues in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) presents in two major forms: type I and type II, characterized by vastly different molecular events leading up to malfunction of glucose homeostasis.</p>},
  author       = {Fåk, Frida},
  isbn         = {9781118982907},
  keyword      = {Atherosclerosis,Diabetes mellitus,Fecal microbiota transplant,Glucose homeostasis,Gut microbiota,Lipopolysaccharides,Metabolic syndrome,Microbial-based therapy,Obesity,Toll-like receptor 4},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  pages        = {351--359},
  publisher    = {Interscience Wiley},
  series       = {The Human Microbiota and Chronic Disease: Dysbiosis as a Cause of Human Pathology},
  title        = {The gut microbiota : A predisposing factor in obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118982907.ch23},
  year         = {2016},
}