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Occurence of hypothermia in a prehospital setting, southern Sweden

Kornfält, Jonas and Johansson, Anders LU (2010) In International Emergency Nursing 18(2). p.76-79
Abstract
Abstract Severe accidental hypothermia mainly affects victims of outdoor accidents. However, hypothermia can also occur in non-traumatized indoor patients. The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of hypothermia obtained at the scene of the rescue in patients classified as priority 1 cases during two three-month periods in southern Sweden.

This prospective, clinical cohort study was performed in a prehospital setting, southern Sweden. Ninety-four patients were included during two three-month periods. According to

where the patients were found they were split into two groups, outdoor or indoor and then separated into three categories; general medicine-, trauma- and intoxicated patients. The environment... (More)
Abstract Severe accidental hypothermia mainly affects victims of outdoor accidents. However, hypothermia can also occur in non-traumatized indoor patients. The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of hypothermia obtained at the scene of the rescue in patients classified as priority 1 cases during two three-month periods in southern Sweden.

This prospective, clinical cohort study was performed in a prehospital setting, southern Sweden. Ninety-four patients were included during two three-month periods. According to

where the patients were found they were split into two groups, outdoor or indoor and then separated into three categories; general medicine-, trauma- and intoxicated patients. The environment temperature was measured on arrival according to the location where the rescue occurred and core temperatures (tympanic membrane) of patients were measured in connection with the monitoring in the ambulance before departure and at the time of arrival to the

emergency room at the hospital.

This study demonstrated that the only group that shows body core temperature below 36 C, was the outdoor intoxication-group during the winter-period (35.7 ± 1.3 C). We conclude that intoxicated patients are at higher risk for hypothermia than minor trauma patients. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
International Emergency Nursing
volume
18
issue
2
pages
76 - 79
publisher
Elsevier
ISSN
1878-013X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
392cf97f-e603-42b1-98c0-0d190dadd97f (old id 3513662)
alternative location
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1755599X09000500
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20382368
date added to LUP
2013-03-06 12:52:49
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:51:09
@article{392cf97f-e603-42b1-98c0-0d190dadd97f,
  abstract     = {Abstract Severe accidental hypothermia mainly affects victims of outdoor accidents. However, hypothermia can also occur in non-traumatized indoor patients. The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of hypothermia obtained at the scene of the rescue in patients classified as priority 1 cases during two three-month periods in southern Sweden.<br/><br>
This prospective, clinical cohort study was performed in a prehospital setting, southern Sweden. Ninety-four patients were included during two three-month periods. According to<br/><br>
where the patients were found they were split into two groups, outdoor or indoor and then separated into three categories; general medicine-, trauma- and intoxicated patients. The environment temperature was measured on arrival according to the location where the rescue occurred and core temperatures (tympanic membrane) of patients were measured in connection with the monitoring in the ambulance before departure and at the time of arrival to the<br/><br>
emergency room at the hospital.<br/><br>
This study demonstrated that the only group that shows body core temperature below 36 C, was the outdoor intoxication-group during the winter-period (35.7 ± 1.3 C). We conclude that intoxicated patients are at higher risk for hypothermia than minor trauma patients.},
  author       = {Kornfält, Jonas and Johansson, Anders},
  issn         = {1878-013X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {76--79},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Emergency Nursing},
  title        = {Occurence of hypothermia in a prehospital setting, southern Sweden},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2010},
}