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Cell therapy for Parkinson's disease: what next?

Björklund, Anders LU and Kordower, Jeffrey H (2013) In Movement Disorders 28(1). p.110-115
Abstract
The idea to use transplants of dopamine-producing cells to substitute for the lost midbrain dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) goes back to the 1970s. In this review we give an overview of the history of cell transplantation in animal models of PD, and summarize the experience gained from the open-label and placebo-controlled clinical trials performed so far using intrastriatal transplants of human fetal dopamine neuroblasts. Further development of this therapeutic approach face numerous challenges, for example in the development of protocols that allow generation of fully functional and safe midbrain dopamine neurons from stem cells. Based on recent promising advancements, efforts are now being made to develop standardized and... (More)
The idea to use transplants of dopamine-producing cells to substitute for the lost midbrain dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) goes back to the 1970s. In this review we give an overview of the history of cell transplantation in animal models of PD, and summarize the experience gained from the open-label and placebo-controlled clinical trials performed so far using intrastriatal transplants of human fetal dopamine neuroblasts. Further development of this therapeutic approach face numerous challenges, for example in the development of protocols that allow generation of fully functional and safe midbrain dopamine neurons from stem cells. Based on recent promising advancements, efforts are now being made to develop standardized and efficient protocols, and adapt these protocols to good laboratory practice (GLP)/good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, to move this technology closer to clinical translation. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Movement Disorders
volume
28
issue
1
pages
110 - 115
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000314995300013
  • pmid:23390097
  • scopus:84873450271
ISSN
0885-3185
DOI
10.1002/mds.25343
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8fa2236f-c052-433c-a72e-6591b798622a (old id 3560096)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23390097?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-03-01 13:31:15
date last changed
2018-01-14 04:10:46
@article{8fa2236f-c052-433c-a72e-6591b798622a,
  abstract     = {The idea to use transplants of dopamine-producing cells to substitute for the lost midbrain dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) goes back to the 1970s. In this review we give an overview of the history of cell transplantation in animal models of PD, and summarize the experience gained from the open-label and placebo-controlled clinical trials performed so far using intrastriatal transplants of human fetal dopamine neuroblasts. Further development of this therapeutic approach face numerous challenges, for example in the development of protocols that allow generation of fully functional and safe midbrain dopamine neurons from stem cells. Based on recent promising advancements, efforts are now being made to develop standardized and efficient protocols, and adapt these protocols to good laboratory practice (GLP)/good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, to move this technology closer to clinical translation. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.},
  author       = {Björklund, Anders and Kordower, Jeffrey H},
  issn         = {0885-3185},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {110--115},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Movement Disorders},
  title        = {Cell therapy for Parkinson's disease: what next?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.25343},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2013},
}