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Different arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculants affect the growth and survival of Podocarpus cunninghamii restoration plantings in the Mackenzie Basin, New Zealand

Williams, Alwyn LU ; Norton, David A. and Ridgway, Hayley J. (2012) In New Zealand Journal of Botany 50(4). p.473-479
Abstract
There is increasing interest in the use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for ecological restoration, as AMF can improve plant nutrition and growth. However, some AMF can have negative effects on plant growth. It is therefore critical that restoration strategies incorporate appropriate AMF. This research investigated differences in growth and survival of Podocarpus cunninghamii (mountain tōtara) cuttings with six different AMF inoculums, with the aim of choosing the most appropriate mycorrhizal species for restoration success. Cuttings of P. cunninghamii were inoculated with AMF ranging from indigenous to exotic, including commercially available AMF and AMF isolated from remnant P. cunninghamii forest and ex-agricultural grassland.... (More)
There is increasing interest in the use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for ecological restoration, as AMF can improve plant nutrition and growth. However, some AMF can have negative effects on plant growth. It is therefore critical that restoration strategies incorporate appropriate AMF. This research investigated differences in growth and survival of Podocarpus cunninghamii (mountain tōtara) cuttings with six different AMF inoculums, with the aim of choosing the most appropriate mycorrhizal species for restoration success. Cuttings of P. cunninghamii were inoculated with AMF ranging from indigenous to exotic, including commercially available AMF and AMF isolated from remnant P. cunninghamii forest and ex-agricultural grassland. Plant growth and survival was compared after two seasons at a high country restoration site in the Mackenzie Basin. Plants treated with forest and indigenous AMF had significantly greater survival than those treated with commercial AMF. Forest AMF also resulted in significantly greater P. cunninghamii growth than all the other treatments. This has potentially important implications for restoration, as improved growth and survival of native woody species can improve restoration success by increasing establishment success and reducing management costs. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
New Zealand Journal of Botany
volume
50
issue
4
pages
473 - 479
publisher
The Royal Society of New Zealand
external identifiers
  • scopus:84876238639
ISSN
0028-825X
DOI
10.1080/0028825X.2012.672429
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
e550d0f6-7666-4d51-8880-074df7804e2f (old id 3560974)
date added to LUP
2013-03-04 07:28:55
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:05:35
@article{e550d0f6-7666-4d51-8880-074df7804e2f,
  abstract     = {There is increasing interest in the use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for ecological restoration, as AMF can improve plant nutrition and growth. However, some AMF can have negative effects on plant growth. It is therefore critical that restoration strategies incorporate appropriate AMF. This research investigated differences in growth and survival of Podocarpus cunninghamii (mountain tōtara) cuttings with six different AMF inoculums, with the aim of choosing the most appropriate mycorrhizal species for restoration success. Cuttings of P. cunninghamii were inoculated with AMF ranging from indigenous to exotic, including commercially available AMF and AMF isolated from remnant P. cunninghamii forest and ex-agricultural grassland. Plant growth and survival was compared after two seasons at a high country restoration site in the Mackenzie Basin. Plants treated with forest and indigenous AMF had significantly greater survival than those treated with commercial AMF. Forest AMF also resulted in significantly greater P. cunninghamii growth than all the other treatments. This has potentially important implications for restoration, as improved growth and survival of native woody species can improve restoration success by increasing establishment success and reducing management costs.},
  author       = {Williams, Alwyn and Norton, David A. and Ridgway, Hayley J.},
  issn         = {0028-825X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {473--479},
  publisher    = {The Royal Society of New Zealand},
  series       = {New Zealand Journal of Botany},
  title        = {Different arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculants affect the growth and survival of Podocarpus cunninghamii restoration plantings in the Mackenzie Basin, New Zealand},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0028825X.2012.672429},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2012},
}