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Endotoxin markers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with interstitial lung diseases

Szponar, Bogumila LU ; Larsson, Lennart LU and Domagala-Kulawik, Joanna (2012) In Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine 7.
Abstract
Background: Exposure to inhaled endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in indoor environments and assessed in secondary tobacco smoke, has been associated with airway inflammation and asthma exacerbation. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) from patients with interstitial lung diseases (sarcoidosis, lung fibrosis, smoking-related ILD, eosinophilic disorders) was analyzed for the markers of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). Methods: BALf was obtained from patients with diffuse lung diseases: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 42), sarcoidosis (n = 22), smoking-related-ILD (n = 11) and eosinophilic disorders (n = 8). Total cell count and differential cell count were performed. In addition,... (More)
Background: Exposure to inhaled endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in indoor environments and assessed in secondary tobacco smoke, has been associated with airway inflammation and asthma exacerbation. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) from patients with interstitial lung diseases (sarcoidosis, lung fibrosis, smoking-related ILD, eosinophilic disorders) was analyzed for the markers of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). Methods: BALf was obtained from patients with diffuse lung diseases: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 42), sarcoidosis (n = 22), smoking-related-ILD (n = 11) and eosinophilic disorders (n = 8). Total cell count and differential cell count were performed. In addition, samples were analyzed for 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OHFAs) of 10-18 carbon chain lengths, as markers of LPS, by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The highest LPS concentration was found in patients with eosinophilic disorders and the lowest in patients with sarcoidosis (p< 0.05) followed by the lung fibrosis and the sr-ILD patients. The difference between LPS in BALf with extremely high eosinophil proportion (> 25%) and those with lower proportion was also significant (p = 0.014). A significant correlation was found between LPS and eosinophils, but not between LPS and lymphocytes, neutrophils, or macrophages count. Conclusions: A positive relationship of LPS and eosinophilic pulmonary disorders may be linked to a persistent eosinophil activation mediated by Th2 pathway: chronic endotoxin exposure would intensify Th2 pathway resulting in fibrosis and, at the same time, eosinophil stimulation, and hence in eosinophilic pulmonary disorders. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, Endotoxin, Interstitial lung diseases
in
Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
volume
7
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000313874400001
  • scopus:84876592074
ISSN
2049-6958
DOI
10.1186/2049-6958-7-54
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9ce800ba-b3bf-4054-8a45-1aaab169e73d (old id 3567983)
date added to LUP
2013-04-02 07:42:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:27:32
@article{9ce800ba-b3bf-4054-8a45-1aaab169e73d,
  abstract     = {Background: Exposure to inhaled endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in indoor environments and assessed in secondary tobacco smoke, has been associated with airway inflammation and asthma exacerbation. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) from patients with interstitial lung diseases (sarcoidosis, lung fibrosis, smoking-related ILD, eosinophilic disorders) was analyzed for the markers of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). Methods: BALf was obtained from patients with diffuse lung diseases: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 42), sarcoidosis (n = 22), smoking-related-ILD (n = 11) and eosinophilic disorders (n = 8). Total cell count and differential cell count were performed. In addition, samples were analyzed for 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OHFAs) of 10-18 carbon chain lengths, as markers of LPS, by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The highest LPS concentration was found in patients with eosinophilic disorders and the lowest in patients with sarcoidosis (p&lt; 0.05) followed by the lung fibrosis and the sr-ILD patients. The difference between LPS in BALf with extremely high eosinophil proportion (&gt; 25%) and those with lower proportion was also significant (p = 0.014). A significant correlation was found between LPS and eosinophils, but not between LPS and lymphocytes, neutrophils, or macrophages count. Conclusions: A positive relationship of LPS and eosinophilic pulmonary disorders may be linked to a persistent eosinophil activation mediated by Th2 pathway: chronic endotoxin exposure would intensify Th2 pathway resulting in fibrosis and, at the same time, eosinophil stimulation, and hence in eosinophilic pulmonary disorders.},
  author       = {Szponar, Bogumila and Larsson, Lennart and Domagala-Kulawik, Joanna},
  issn         = {2049-6958},
  keyword      = {Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid,Endotoxin,Interstitial lung diseases},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine},
  title        = {Endotoxin markers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with interstitial lung diseases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2049-6958-7-54},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2012},
}