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Aerosol indirect effects on glaciated clouds. Part I : Model description

Kudzotsa, Innocent; Phillips, Vaughan T J LU ; Dobbie, Steven; Formenton, Marco LU ; Sun, Jiming; Allen, Grant; Bansemer, Aaron; Spracklen, Dominick and Pringle, Kirsty (2016) In Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 142(698). p.1958-1969
Abstract

Various improvements were made to a state-of-the-art aerosol–cloud model and comparison of the model results with observations from field campaigns was performed. The strength of this aerosol–cloud model is in its ability to explicitly resolve all the known modes of heterogeneous cloud droplet activation and ice crystal nucleation. The model links cloud particle activation with the aerosol loading and chemistry of seven different aerosol species. These improvements to the model resulted in more accurate prediction especially of droplet and ice crystal number concentrations in the upper troposphere and enabled the model to directly sift the aerosol indirect effects based on the chemistry and concentration of the aerosols. In addition,... (More)

Various improvements were made to a state-of-the-art aerosol–cloud model and comparison of the model results with observations from field campaigns was performed. The strength of this aerosol–cloud model is in its ability to explicitly resolve all the known modes of heterogeneous cloud droplet activation and ice crystal nucleation. The model links cloud particle activation with the aerosol loading and chemistry of seven different aerosol species. These improvements to the model resulted in more accurate prediction especially of droplet and ice crystal number concentrations in the upper troposphere and enabled the model to directly sift the aerosol indirect effects based on the chemistry and concentration of the aerosols. In addition, continental and maritime cases were simulated for the purpose of validating the aerosol–cloud model and for investigating the critical microphysical and dynamical mechanisms of aerosol indirect effects from anthropogenic solute and solid aerosols, focusing mainly on glaciated clouds. The simulations showed that increased solute aerosols reduced cloud particle sizes by about 5 μm and inhibited warm rain processes. Cloud fractions and their optical thicknesses were increased quite substantially in both cases. Although liquid mixing ratios were boosted, there was however a substantial reduction of ice mixing ratios in the upper troposphere owing to the increase in snow production aloft. These results are detailed in the subsequent parts of this study.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
aerosol indirect effects, aerosol-cloud interactions, aerosols, cloud microphysics, cloud-resolving models
in
Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society
volume
142
issue
698
pages
12 pages
publisher
Royal Meteorological Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:84964626161
  • wos:000380941100007
  • scopus:84992306091
ISSN
0035-9009
DOI
10.1002/qj.2791
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
35e956b9-c9ea-4b73-9e00-47ded9bee33d
date added to LUP
2016-10-10 11:19:59
date last changed
2017-05-29 11:29:27
@article{35e956b9-c9ea-4b73-9e00-47ded9bee33d,
  abstract     = {<p>Various improvements were made to a state-of-the-art aerosol–cloud model and comparison of the model results with observations from field campaigns was performed. The strength of this aerosol–cloud model is in its ability to explicitly resolve all the known modes of heterogeneous cloud droplet activation and ice crystal nucleation. The model links cloud particle activation with the aerosol loading and chemistry of seven different aerosol species. These improvements to the model resulted in more accurate prediction especially of droplet and ice crystal number concentrations in the upper troposphere and enabled the model to directly sift the aerosol indirect effects based on the chemistry and concentration of the aerosols. In addition, continental and maritime cases were simulated for the purpose of validating the aerosol–cloud model and for investigating the critical microphysical and dynamical mechanisms of aerosol indirect effects from anthropogenic solute and solid aerosols, focusing mainly on glaciated clouds. The simulations showed that increased solute aerosols reduced cloud particle sizes by about 5 μm and inhibited warm rain processes. Cloud fractions and their optical thicknesses were increased quite substantially in both cases. Although liquid mixing ratios were boosted, there was however a substantial reduction of ice mixing ratios in the upper troposphere owing to the increase in snow production aloft. These results are detailed in the subsequent parts of this study.</p>},
  author       = {Kudzotsa, Innocent and Phillips, Vaughan T J and Dobbie, Steven and Formenton, Marco and Sun, Jiming and Allen, Grant and Bansemer, Aaron and Spracklen, Dominick and Pringle, Kirsty},
  issn         = {0035-9009},
  keyword      = {aerosol indirect effects,aerosol-cloud interactions,aerosols,cloud microphysics,cloud-resolving models},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {698},
  pages        = {1958--1969},
  publisher    = {Royal Meteorological Society},
  series       = {Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society},
  title        = {Aerosol indirect effects on glaciated clouds. Part I : Model description},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/qj.2791},
  volume       = {142},
  year         = {2016},
}