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Offspring genetic structure reveals mating and nest infestation behaviour of an invasive parasitic fly (Philornis downsi) of Galápagos birds

Dudaniec, Rachael LU ; Gardner, Michael G and Kleindorfer, Sonia (2010) In Biological Invasions 12(3). p.581-592
Abstract
The natural reproductive behaviour of invasive insects is pivotal knowledge for managing species of ecological or economic concern. We use microsatellites to examine female multiple mating and multiple nest infestations in the introduced parasitic fly, Philornis downsi, which causes high mortality in endemic birds on the Galápagos Islands. We analyse larvae and pupae within 57 nests from Santa Cruz and Floreana Islands in both the highland and lowland habitats. Sib-ship reconstructions of offspring revealed that up to five females may infest a single nest, while multiple mating in females was frequent (65% of reconstructed maternal genotypes), with an average of 1.91 (±0.06 SE) males per female. Genetic relatedness (R) of offspring within... (More)
The natural reproductive behaviour of invasive insects is pivotal knowledge for managing species of ecological or economic concern. We use microsatellites to examine female multiple mating and multiple nest infestations in the introduced parasitic fly, Philornis downsi, which causes high mortality in endemic birds on the Galápagos Islands. We analyse larvae and pupae within 57 nests from Santa Cruz and Floreana Islands in both the highland and lowland habitats. Sib-ship reconstructions of offspring revealed that up to five females may infest a single nest, while multiple mating in females was frequent (65% of reconstructed maternal genotypes), with an average of 1.91 (±0.06 SE) males per female. Genetic relatedness (R) of offspring within nests was generally low, though lowland nests on Floreana had higher R than highland nests. Knowledge of the reproductive behaviour of P. downsi is necessary for modelling appropriate management strategies, in particular, the sterile insect technique, for which success is greatly influenced by female multiple mating. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Philornis downsi, Darwin’s finches, Female multiple mating, Sterile insect technique, Ectoparasitism
in
Biological Invasions
volume
12
issue
3
pages
581 - 592
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:77952882515
ISSN
1387-3547
DOI
10.1007/s10530-009-9464-x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
42970b02-921d-41c0-9cd1-a57c1d3a43a9 (old id 3738404)
date added to LUP
2013-05-23 13:59:39
date last changed
2018-06-03 03:22:58
@article{42970b02-921d-41c0-9cd1-a57c1d3a43a9,
  abstract     = {The natural reproductive behaviour of invasive insects is pivotal knowledge for managing species of ecological or economic concern. We use microsatellites to examine female multiple mating and multiple nest infestations in the introduced parasitic fly, Philornis downsi, which causes high mortality in endemic birds on the Galápagos Islands. We analyse larvae and pupae within 57 nests from Santa Cruz and Floreana Islands in both the highland and lowland habitats. Sib-ship reconstructions of offspring revealed that up to five females may infest a single nest, while multiple mating in females was frequent (65% of reconstructed maternal genotypes), with an average of 1.91 (±0.06 SE) males per female. Genetic relatedness (R) of offspring within nests was generally low, though lowland nests on Floreana had higher R than highland nests. Knowledge of the reproductive behaviour of P. downsi is necessary for modelling appropriate management strategies, in particular, the sterile insect technique, for which success is greatly influenced by female multiple mating.},
  author       = {Dudaniec, Rachael and Gardner, Michael G and Kleindorfer, Sonia},
  issn         = {1387-3547},
  keyword      = {Philornis downsi,Darwin’s finches,Female multiple mating,Sterile insect technique,Ectoparasitism},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {581--592},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Biological Invasions},
  title        = {Offspring genetic structure reveals mating and nest infestation behaviour of an invasive parasitic fly (Philornis downsi) of Galápagos birds},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-009-9464-x},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2010},
}